All Courses in Spanish

Language and Culture

SPAN 1: Spanish I

Introduction to spoken and written Spanish. Intensive study of introductory grammar and vocabulary with a focus on culture. Oral class activities, readings and compositions. Weekly practice in the virtual language lab includes viewing TV series and films and weekly drill sessions. Never serves in partial satisfaction of the Distributive or World Culture Requirements.

Sample Syllabus

SPAN 2: Spanish II

Continuation of SPAN 1. Further intensive study of grammar and vocabulary with a focus on culture. Oral class activities, readings and compositions and continued practice in the virtual language laboratory. Weekly drill sessions. Never serves in partial satisfaction of the Distributive or World Culture Requirements. Open to first-year students by qualifying test and to others who have passed SPAN 1.

Sample Syllabus

SPAN 3: Spanish III

Continuation of SPAN 2. SPAN 3 provides additional, intensive study of grammar and vocabulary with a focus on literature and culture. Oral class activities, readings and compositions and continued practice in the virtual language laboratory. Weekly drill sessions. Completion of this course on campus or as part of the LSA constitutes fulfillment of the language requirement. Never serves in partial satisfaction of the Distributive or World Culture Requirements. Open to first-year students by qualifying test and to others who have passed SPAN 2.

Winter and Spring 2018 and 2019 - LSA Barcelona

Spring 2018 and 2019 - LSA Buenos Aires

Sample Syllabus

SPAN 5: (Language Study Abroad)

Taught in the context of the Language Study Abroad program, this course in Hispanic culture reinforces listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills in Spanish. The thematic focus is on local and regional art history, with special emphasis on the city as a dynamic form of cultural production through time. Attending to political, social, economic, and religious contexts, the course features brief presentations by local personnel as well as relevant field trips. Assignments include conversation, writing projects, oral presentations, and a final course examination. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Dartmouth Language Study Abroad Program. Dist: WCult: W (Spain), NW (Buenos Aires).

Winter and Spring 2018 and 2019 - LSA Barcelona

Spring 2018 and 2019 - LSA Buenos Aires

SPAN 6: (Language Study Abroad)

Taught in the context of the Language Study Abroad program, this introductory course in Hispanic literature strengthens listening, reading, speaking and writing skills in Spanish. The reading materials are selected to help students develop their analytical strategies as well as to expose them to relevant cultural issues and major figures of the region in which they are studying. Assigned work may include brief research papers, oral presentations, a mid-term exam and a final course examination. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Dartmouth Language Study Abroad Program. Dist: LIT; WCult: W (Spain), NW (Buenos Aires).

Winter and Spring 2018 and 2019 - LSA Barcelona

Spring 2018 and 2019 - LSA Buenos Aires

SPAN 7: First-Year Seminars in Spanish and Spanish-American Literature

The First-year Seminar Program serves four purposes. First, by means of a uniform writing requirement, the seminar stresses the importance of written expression in all disciplines. Second, it provides an attractive and exciting supplement to the usual introductory survey. Third, it guarantees each first-year student at least one small course. Fourth, the program engages each first-year student in the research process, offering an early experience of the scholarship that fuels Dartmouth's upper-level courses.

In Winter 2018 - Don Quixote and the Quixotic in Literature and Film.

Don Quixote regularly tops the lists of the greatest novels of all time.  In this course will examine Cervantes’ masterpiece and some of the ways it has influenced world literature and culture.  We will discuss themes related to the novel, including: what Don Quixote says about the dangers of reading (or watching films); the philosophical debate between realism and idealism; and the value of friendship and tolerance in times of crisis.  We will read Part I of Don Quixote and read critical works about it.  Films will include Lost in La Mancha, and the musical Man of la Mancha.  We will also examine recent efforts to recover Shakespeare’s lost 1613 play based on Don Quixote. Dist.: INT or LIT and W. Professor: Paul Carranza.

SPAN 9: Culture and Conversation: Advanced Spanish Language

This course serves as a bridge between SPAN 3 and SPAN 20. Through the intensive study of a variety of aural media (e.g., documentaries, TV and radio programs, films), grammar, vocabulary and speech acts as presented in the course packet, students will actively practice listening and speaking skills with the goal of reaching an Intermediate High Level (on the ACTFL scale). Additional written material may be added according to the professor’s particular interests. Prerequisite: SPAN 3; AP Lang 4 or AP Lit 4; local placement test 600+, or permission of the instructor. It serves as a prerequisite for SPAN 20.

Sample Syllabus

SPAN 15: Intensive Writing Workshop for Spanish Speakers

This course draws on the strengths of Latinx Language Learners in order to enhance their skills in writing and composition. Using a variety of media and genres, students will explore the cultural experiences of US Latinx communities and the Spanish-speaking world. The course will focus on structures related to languages and cultures in contact, and review grammar to expand students’ range from informal to academic communication. The course will have an experiential learning component, including student projects throughout the term, and participation in events around campus related to Spanish-speaking communities. It can be used to fulfill the language requirement. It serves as pre-requisite for Spanish 20. May not be taken in conjunction with Spanish 9. 

Spring 2019: Professor Israel Reyes (11)
Spring 2020: Professor Kianny Antigua (11)

Advanced Language, Literature, and Cultural Studies

SPAN 20: Writing and Reading: A Critical and Cultural Approach

SPAN 20 is the first course of the Major/Minor, and serves as transition between the skills acquired through the Spanish language courses (Spanish LSA or equivalent preparation) and those needed for all upper-division courses (30 and above). Through the study of critical and theoretical vocabulary, and the reading of short stories, poems, films, theatrical plays and journalistic articles, students will acquire analytic tools to comprehend and analyze several types of texts. This course is also designed to familiarize students with different textual genres and a wide array of literary and interpretative key concepts. Prerequisite: Participation in one of the Spanish LSA programs; SPAN 9 or 15; exemption from SPAN 9 based on test scores (see Department web site); or permission of instructor. SPAN 20 may be taken in conjunction with 30-level survey courses. It serves as a prerequisite for all Spanish courses 40 and higher. Dist: LIT.

Sample Syllabus

SPAN 21: Traditional and Contemporary Andean Cosmogonies and Cultural Production: A Historical Approach (LSA+)

This course is designed to give students an understanding of the current intricacies of Peruvian Andean Cultures.  Peruvian society has undergone a series of historical transformations, complicated by the interface of Andean, Western, African and Amazonian traditions.  The running themes of the course will be interculturality, imposition of culture and cultural manipulations as they occur historically (conquest, mestizaje, racism, diglosia, globalization, etc.).  These themes will be addressed from a historical, anthropological, and sociological perspective.  The course program is coordinated with a variety of cultural visits and excursions that are an intrinsic part of its content. Dist: SOC WCult: NW.*

Fall 2018 and 2019 - LSA+ Cuzco

SPAN 22: Modern and Contemporary Spanish Artistic and Cultural Production (L.S.A.+)

This course will make students fluent in some of the main topics relevant to modern and contemporary Spanish cultural production, with a particular emphasis on Northern Spain.  The course will not count towards the major or minor. Dist: ART; WCult: W.

Summer 2018 and 2019 - LSA+ Santander

SPAN 23: Argentine Cultural Heritage (FSP)

This course deepens the student’s knowledge of the Argentine art and cultures through the study and discussion of the visual, architectural and plastic arts, as well as music and performance. The materials will expose the students to the main trends and topics of contemporary Argentine art, cultures and society. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program, Argentina. Dist: ART; WCult: NW.

Spring 2018 and 2019 - FSP Buenos Aires

SPAN 24: Spanish Cultural Heritage (FSP)

This course deepens the student’s knowledge of the Spanish art and cultures through the study and discussion of the visual, architectural and plastic arts, as well as music and performance. The materials will expose the students to the main trends and topics of contemporary Spanish art, cultures and society. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program, Spain. Dist: ART; WCult: W.

Fall 2018 and 2019 - FSP Madrid

SPAN 30: Introduction to Hispanic Studies I: Middle Ages to 17th Century

This course presents an overview of major literary trends and cultural productions from the Middle Ages to the 17th century in both their Spanish and Spanish American contexts. Students will read a representative selection of major literary works from that period, both Peninsular and Spanish-American, and discuss theoretical, aesthetic, and critical issues pertinent to the Renaissance, the Baroque, colonialism, syncretism, etc. Texts may also be cultural, visual, and/or filmic. Prerequisite: SPAN 20. Dist: LIT; WCult: W.

SPAN 31: Introduction to Hispanic Studies II: 18th and 19th Centuries

This course presents a chronological study of major trans-Atlantic literary trends and cultural productions, corresponding to the cultural and aesthetic movements of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Students will read a representative selection of major literary works, both Peninsular and Spanish-American, from that period and discuss theoretical, aesthetic, and critical issues pertinent to modernity, empire, enlightenment, nationalism, gender, democracy, etc. Texts may also be, cultural, visual, and/or filmic. Prerequisite: SPAN 20. Dist: LIT; WCult: W.

SPAN 32: Introduction to Hispanic Studies III: 20th - 21st Centuries

This course presents a chronological study of trans-Atlantic major literary trends and cultural productions, corresponding to the cultural and aesthetic movements from the 1880s to the present. Students will read a representative selection of major literary works from that period, both Peninsular and Spanish-American, and discuss theoretical, aesthetic, and critical issues pertinent to modernismo, the avant-garde, revolution, post-modernism, etc. Texts may also be cultural, visual, and/or filmic. Prerequisite: SPAN 20. Dist: LIT; WCult: W.

Summer 2018 and 2019 - LSA+ Santander

Fall 2018 and 2019 - LSA+ Cuzco

SPAN 33: Argentine Civilization: Society, Culture, and Politics in Argentina (FSP)

This course studies socio-political events in the Southern Cone that have shaped the contemporary configuration of society in Argentina. Emphasis will be placed on key political figures, social movements, oppositional tensions, dictatorship and democracy, and their articulation in the cultural field. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program. Dist: SOC; WCult: NW.

Spring 2018 and 2019 - FSP Buenos Aires

SPAN 34: Society, Culture and Politics in Spain (FSP)

This courses studies socio-political events in the Iberian Peninsula that have shaped the contemporary configuration of society in Spain. Emphasis will be placed on key political figures, social movements, oppositional tensions, dictatorship and democracy, and their articulation in the cultural field. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program, Spain. Dist: SOC; WCult: W.

Fall 2018 and 2019 - FSP Madrid

SPAN 35: Studies in Spanish-American Literature and Culture (FSP)

This course is designed to offer students an opportunity to study a topic of interest in Spanish American literature and culture through the reading of a wide variety of literary and cultural texts. Emphasis will be placed on Argentina and the Southern Cone. Topics may vary. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program, Argentina. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW.

Spring 2018 and 2019 - FSP Buenos Aires

SPAN 36: Studies in Modern and Contemporary Spanish Literature (FSP)

This course is designed to offer students an opportunity to study a topic of interest in the literature's and cultures of Spain through the reading of a wide variety of literary and cultural texts. Topics may vary. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program, Spain. Dist: LIT; WCult: W.

Fall 2018 and 2019 - FSP Madrid

SPAN 40: Hispanic Literature and Culture by Period

This course will focus on the study of the significant historical periods and cultural movements of the Hispanic world. It is organized according to chronological eras that are marked by distinct cultural and literary movements. Areas covered will be the Middle Ages, the culture of the Renaissance and the Baroque, the Colonial Period, Enlightenment and Modernity, Nineteenth-Century Romanticism and Realism, the Avant-Gardes, Post-modernism, and new developments in the contemporary period. One or more periods will be selected for study. Spanish courses numbered 40 and above may be repeated for credit when offered as different topics. Prerequisite: SPAN 20. Dist: LIT; WCult: Varies.

In Fall 2018- Spanish 40.09: The Shock of the Metropolis: America in the works of Lorca, Buñuel, and Dalí

This course will explore the work of three major Spanish artists: the poet and playwright Federico García Lorca (1898-1936), the film director Luis Buñuel (1900-1983), and the painter and writer Salvador Dalí (1904-1989) in their relationship with the United States, in particular with the city of New York. It will examine the cultural dialogue among painting, literature and film during a foundational moment of the modernist and avant-garde period in Europe and America. Our course examines the relationship of these artists from an interdisciplinary perspective, paying special attention to the influence exerted by the United States on Dalí, Lorca and Buñuel’s work, and conversely to their legacy in American culture and society. Professor del Pino.

In Winter 2020- Spanish 40.10: Marginality and Novelistic Discourse in Early Modernity

In this course we will explore the role of marginality in the configuration of the novelistic discourse in Early Modernity. Rather than assume that marginality implies social outcasts exclusively, we will work with a broader concept. Adventurers, religious minorities (such as witches, hermits, moriscos or renegades), rogues, or even children of wealthy families, drawn by the titillating charm of living dangerously, are the aesthetic substance of these novels. They articulate an aesthetic which embraces not only those characters that forge their identity in the fringes of society, but every day social types. Through the lens of marginality, and departing from some early examples, students will read and analyze a set of novels written in this period by canonical authors (Fernando de Rojas, Miguel de Cervantes, Lope de Vega, Francisco de Quevedo, María de Zayas, or Mateo Alemán) but also anonymous works such as La doncella Teodor or El abencerraje y la hermosa Jarifa. Dist: LIT; W. Professor Isabel Lozano.

Spanish 43: Hispanic Literature and Culture by Genre

A literary genre is defined as an established category of written work employing a set of recognizable common conventions, such as technique, style, structure or subject matter. This course will focus on the study of Hispanic literatures and cultures and is organized around one or more basic genres like poetry, drama, novel, and essay. Other articulating categories for the course may include epic poetry, tragic drama, short-fiction narrative, the picaresque novel, and the melodrama, among others. The course will provide students with the appropriate critical vocabulary to understand the specificity of the genre or sub-genre examined in this course. Prerequisite: SPAN 20.

In Fall 2018 - Spanish 43.04: The Best Hispanic Poetry: Emotion for the Contemporary Reader.

Sentiment and subjectivity establish themselves as pillars of modern poetry. In order to overcome its restrictive communicative function and prevail over time, language dwells in a figurative realm with the assistance of a metaphorical leap. This course will concentrate on the study of some of the finest poems and poets of the Spanish language. Starting with some early examples of the Castilian lyrical tradition (Jorge Manrique, Garcilaso de la Vega, Luis de Góngora or Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz), we will take pleasure in reading and study major canonical figures like Rubén Darío, Gabriela Mistral, Federico García Lorca, and Pablo Neruda. Particular attention will be paid to contemporary manifestations of poetry that inhabit the territory of popular songs. Dist:LIT; WCult:W. Professor: José del Pino.

In Summer 2019- Spanish 43.06: Tango Argentino: Music, Dance, Poetry, Community

Since its birth the Argentine tango continues to be a complex art form with popular roots and international reach beyond the Southern Cone. The tango has stood the test of time as a form of popular culture that many consider a lifestyle, a religion, and a worldview. Since it is at once a type of music, a dance, a distinctive type of poetry and a community (social dance or milonga), the tango requires a variety of disciplines to interpret it. This course will provide students with tools to understand tango as music, poetry, dance, language (lunfardo), and melodrama, from the 19th century to its current state of political resistance and globalized commodification. The course will have an experiential component to allow space for listening to the music and learning basic tango salón footwork with invited guests. Dis: NW; ART. Professor Noelia Cirnigliaro

Spanish 45: Regional/National/Trans-Atlantic Approaches to Hispanic Studies

This course studies the complex intersections between literatures, languages, cultures and their national, regional, and trans-Atlantic contexts in Spain, Latin America, and the US.  In this course, literary and cultural expressions are studied in relation to place in a wide array of historical contexts.  Issues may include literature and colonialism, "indigenismo," the city/country dialectic, regional and national languages and cultural interdependence, the arts as buffers of political/nationalistic violence, national borders and cultural identity, and the formation of national literatures. Prerequisite: Span 20. Dist: LIT; WCult: varies.

In Spring 2019 - Spanish 45.02: Diaspora and Economic Imaginaries in Hispanic Caribbean Literature.

This course will explore how colonialism, slavery, migration, and exile have influenced the way Cubans, Dominicans, and Puerto Ricans imagine themselves as social agents who have or lack the ability to change their economic conditions. Students will gain an understanding of the economic theories that find their articulation in fiction, theater, and film through the representation of lived experience, cultural contact and conflict, and political and social movements. Readings will be in both Spanish and English, while class discussions and written assignments will be conducted in Spanish. Dist:LIT; WCult:NW. Professor: Israel Reyes.

In Summer 2019- Spanish 45.01: Politics of Inequality, Economy, Social Struggle, and the 19th Century Latin American Novel.

This course explores the Latin-American nineteenth-century novelistic tradition through the scope of Marx’s definition of “Primitive Accumulation.” Starting from Latin America’s independence as a moment of foundational violence that reframes and crystalizes the inequality of social classes and races in the continent, we will explore the abuse and exploitation of slaves in Cuban mid-century society (Gertrudis Gómez de Avellaneda’s Sab -1841); the discrimination and mistreatment of indigenous communities justified by colonial traditions of servitude in Peru (Clorinda Matto de Turner’s Aves sin Nido -1889); and the anti-European immigrant movements in Argentina at the end of the century (Eugenio Cambaceres’ En la Sangre -1887). Theoretical framework by: Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels, José Carlos Mariátegui, John Lynch, György Lukács, Eric Hobsbawm, and David Harvey. Dist: NW; LIT. Professor Sebastían Díaz. 

Spanish 50: Gender and Sexuality in Hispanic Studies

This course will explore how the study of gender and sexuality is integral to understanding the complexities of Hispanic societies and cultures. In addition to analyzing literary texts and cultural and artistic productions, students will also examine theoretical and critical approaches to the study of gender and sexuality. Topics may include feminist movements, the construction and performance of gender, the theories as they relate to Hispanic embodiments and representations in literature and culture. Prerequisites: SPAN 20. Dist: LIT; WCult: CI.

In Spring 2019 - Spanish 50.02: New Sexual and Social Identity in Film and Literature in Post-Franco Spain.

This course addresses changes in Spanish society since the end of the dictatorship. These include the relativization of family, love, drugs, sexuality, life, death, and democracy; and the devaluation of morals, history, and culture. Authors include Vázquez Montalbán, Marías, Loriga, Montero, Riera, Almodóvar, de la Iglesia, Amenábar, and Balagueró. Dist:LIT; WCult:CI. Professor: Txetxu Aguado.

In Fall 2019-Spanish 50.04: Let's Not Talk About It. Eroticism in Modern Spain

Erotic literature in Spain has often been dismissed as inferior, offensive and taboo. However, many of these materials circulated clandestinely and found their way to underground publications. By exploring literary works, engravings, photographs, and films, this course intends to concentrate on the erotic nature of a number of Spanish cultural works starting from the 18th to the mid-20th century in which the obscene, the pornographic and the erotic serve as platform to discuss other issues such as gender politics, gendered relations, Iberian humor, social marginalization, race, identity, and the concept of Spanishness. Dist: W; LIT. Professor Sara Muñoz. 

In Spring 2020- Spanish 50.01: Of Machos and Malinches: Gender and Sexual Identities in Latin/o American Literature and Culture. 

This course examines how gender and sexuality align with or contest local discourses on Latin/o American cultural autochthony and national identity and explores gender and sexuality in the context of global culture and transnationalism. We will also analyze how gender and sexual identities are articulated in language, performance, and visual and aural media.  Along with primary literary texts, film, art, and music, students will engage with scholarly texts that contextualize the historical, cultural, and linguistic traditions from which gender and sexual identities emerge, as well as those critical and theoretical interventions that deconstruct essentialist notions of the body and scrutinize the political implications of oppositional discourses on gender and sexuality. Dis: CI; Lit. Professor Israel Reyes. 

SPAN 53: Topics in Spanish Linguistics, Rhetoric, and Poetics

The focus of study for this course will be the evolution of the Spanish language from its old and early modern manifestations to contemporary uses. Specific geographical contexts will be given special attention. Topics may include the constitution of Castilian as a national language and its relation to other peninsular languages; the history of linguistic change on all levels (phonetic/phonological, morphological, syntactic, and semantic); the influence of Arabic, indigenous languages of the Americas, English, and dialectal variants. Fundamental notions of rhetoric and poetics will be central to this course as well. Spanish courses numbered 40 and above may be repeated for credit when offered as different topics. Prerequisite: SPAN 20. Dist: LIT; WCult: Varies.

In Fall 2017 - Spanish 53.01: Introduction to the History of the Spanish Language.

This course features a series of lectures on the history and geography of the Spanish language. In history, it provides an account of how the Spanish language derived from Latin, with particular regard for phonological and morpho-syntax development. In geography, students will learn how to observe and record the reality of Spanish currently used in Spain and Latin America. The objective of this course is to understand the derivation of different linguistic phenomena and the geographic variations of Spanish by exploring its history and geography.  Dist:INT or LIT; WCult:W. Professor: Isabel Lozano-Renieblas.

In Winter 2019 - Spanish 53.02: Spanish Linguistics, Rhetoric, Poetics and the Politics of Language.

This course surveys the evolution of the Castilian language, with special emphasis on the influence of Arabic and indigenous languages of the Americas, Judeo-Spanish (ladino), Italianisms and Cultisms, Voseo, and the influence of English. A special emphasis is given to the period of standardization between the 17th and 19th centuries that leads to the Spanish we speak and write today. A second core of the course reflects on the politics of language by focusing on the history of Language Academies; the production of Grammars, Dictionaries, and Orthographies; the relation between Castilian and other languages in Spain and Latin America; the history of Hispanism; and the place of bilingualism in the United States. Dist:INT; WCult:W. Professor: Noelia Cirnigliaro.

Spanish 55: Hispanic Literature, Culture, and Politics

This is an interdisciplinary course that studies through diverse representations in literature and the arts major sociopolitical realities that have shaken and transformed the Hispanic world such as the Conquest, colonialism, the rise of the modern nation states, the Mexican and Cuban revolutions, the Spanish Civil War, Latin America's "dirty" wars, etc.  The course will explore the interconnection between culture and politics allowing the student to read culture as a political text and political events as texts. Prerequisites: Span 20. Dist: SOC; WCult: varies.

In Summer 2018 - Spanish 55.09: Revoltosos/as: Forms of Rebellion and Revolution in Imperial Spain and Spanish America.

An indigenous rebellion helps overthrow a viceroy in Colonial Mexico; a woman in disguise joins the army and receives royal permission to live as a transgender male; a poet openly criticizes court politicians; a painter manages to question Catholic dogmas in his religious portraiture. It may be hard to imagine that there were multiple forms of rebellion and revolution under Absolutism in early modern Europe. But that is of course a prejudice from our modern times that need to be debunked in light of social attitudes towards power documented during that time period. We will explore salient cases from political revolution to subtle resistance in early modern texts and images of Spain and Spanish America. We will unearth impactful political upheavals as well as individual and collective forms of resistance relating gender, race, religion, etc., and forms of anti-establishment sentiment that occurred more often than we could imagine. Dist:LIT; WCult:W. Professor: Noelia Cirnigliaro.

In Winter 2019 - Spanish 55.04: Humor and Politics in Latin American Literature, Film and Culture.

Comedy and humor often serve to undermine cultural elitism and denounce social injustice. Many Latin American authors, filmmakers, and artists have used comedy and humor in politically subversive ways, but also as a way to legitimize the cultures and communities of the marginal and disenfranchised. This course will explore several theories of humor as well as Latin American traditions of humor. Dist:SOC. Professor: Israel Reyes.

In Winter 2019 - Spanish 55.07: Revolution and Art in Mexico.

This course explores the cultural production of the Mexican Revolution (1910-1940) through an analysis of essays, literature, visual art and cinema. It focuses on how the revolutionary ethos entered into relation with art, race, gender, religion and socialism in order to conceive a new social order and new forms of cultural imagination. The course content provides a clear understanding of the diverse set of interests and ideas that shaped the revolutionary process and continue to play an important role in contemporary Mexico. At the same time, the close examination of revolutionary representations sheds light on the problematic relations between aesthetics and politics, thought and praxis in modern societies. Works by Orozco, Rivera, Campobello, Vasconcelos, Flores Magón, Azuela, Maples Arce, among others. Dist:ART; WCult:NW. Professor: Jorge Quintana Navarrete.

In Winter 2020- Spanish 55.10: Mexican Utopias: 19th and 20th Century Socialist Literature and Thought. 

This course explores the images of otherworldly places, perfect communities and future societies in Mexican culture. We will focus on how the utopian imagination entered into relation with science and socialism throughout the 19th and early 20th centuries. Through the reading of early science fiction works and socialist utopias by Mexican artists, we will discuss the impact of "utopian" thinkers (Saint Simon, Fourier, Owen) and scientific discourses (astronomy, medicine, hypnotism) on Mexican literature. Dist: Lit; NW. Professor Jorge Quintana- Navarrete

SPAN 60: Race and Ethnicity in Hispanic Studies

A common misperception about race and ethnicity is that they are uniformly defined and that one region’s understanding of these terms is identical to any other. How are race and ethnicity conceptualized and represented in Spain, Latin America, and U.S. Latino communities? This course will examine the particular historical, regional, and cultural factors that give rise to different notions of race and ethnicity in the Hispanic world. Individual offerings of this course may focus on one or more of the following: Moorish Spain and the Reconquista; the Jewish Diaspora in Spain and Latin America; indigenous societies in Latin America; racial and cultural “mestizaje”; whiteness, racial purity, and “blanqueamiento”; slavery, the African Diaspora, and “afro-latinidades.” Spanish courses numbered 40 and above may be repeated for credit when offered as different topics. Prerequisite: SPAN 20. Dist: LIT; WCult: CI.

In Fall 2018 - Spanish 60.03: Racism at Work Then and Now. 

This course will discuss the aesthetic projects and the ideological suggestions stemming from a long history of representations of race, ethnicity, and culture in Spanish American literature. A focus will be on those fueling the constitution of colonial and neo-colonial projects, and those reshaping decolonization and national identities. Particular attention will be given to bigoted images upon the “subaltern” other, from notions of a lesser humanity and condescendence to thoughts for marginalization, oppression and open racism. Cases of genuine understanding and integration of the other will be scrutinized as well. Materials for this class include selections from Columbus, Cortés, Guamán Poma, Las Casas, Garcilaso, Lunarejo, Avellaneda, Villaverde, Mansilla, Albújar, Matto, Sarmiento, Vasconcelos, Guillén, J.M. Arguedas, Menchú, Cornejo Polar and Fernández Retamar. Dist.: Professor: Raúl Bueno.

SPAN 63: Hispanic Film Studies

Film and the visual arts in Spain, Latin America, and/or the US will be studied under different approaches in order to: understand the historical evolution of film making within these contexts; examine the different film genres (surrealism, neorealism, melodrama, film noir, Hollywood realism, animation, documentary, etc.) in their Hispanic contexts; study the body of work of renowned Latino, Spanish, and Latin American filmmakers and visual artists; analyze important cultural or historical events through their visual representations (the Mexican Revolution, the Spanish Civil War, the Cuban Revolution, end of Francoism, etc.); etc. Students will become familiar with relevant concepts in film analysis, film theory, and cultural studies and learn how issues of representation in the visual arts are linked to their literary counterparts. Spanish courses numbered 40 and above may be repeated for credit when offered as different topics. Prerequisite: SPAN 20. Dist: ART; WCult: Varies.

In Fall 2018 - Spanish 63.01: Latin American Film.

In this survey of Latin American film we will study the Mexican Golden Age of film (1936-1969), Cuba’s revolutionary film (Lucia) as well as other radical films of the 60s (Sangre del condor), and women’s films. We will end looking at the most important production coming out of Latin America today such as the films of Francisco Lombardi, Claudia Llosa, Lucrecia Martel and others. We will also study important film manifestos. Dist:ART; WCult:NW. Professor: Silvia Spitta.

In Fall 2019- Spanish 63.06 Youth Culture in Argentine Cinema

Unlike Hollywood cinema, in Argentina films about teenagers have never been a genre in itself, and yet the list of Argentine films about teenagers is strikingly large. This course will embark on a historical journey through films that focus on the adolescent experience as a way to represent political and social tensions. We will see films about teenagers from different decades, but we will focus mainly on the films after the 2001 crisis, when a significant number of Argentine movies about teenage characters were released. Films by Acuña, Carri, Deus, Dos Santos, Fund, Martel, Mora, Murga, Piroyansky, Rejtman. Dist: NW; ART. Professor Julio Ariza

SPAN 65: Hispanic Performance, Media, and the Arts

In our increasingly globalized society, what impact have transnationalism and new technologies had on the formation and articulation of local cultures in the Hispanic world? How do subjects remember and represent themselves as embodied actors in the spaces where conflicting and contestatory identities meet? How have television, the visual and graphic arts, and music redefined national space and identity in Spanish, Latin American, and U.S. Latino communities? Individual offerings of this course may focus on one or more of the following: theater, performance, and performativity; comics and the graphic arts; literature and the marketplace; the politics of mass media; sports and national identity; and popular culture’s strategies of resistance. Spanish courses numbered 40 and above may be repeated for credit when offered as different topics. Prerequisite: SPAN 20. Dist: ART; WCult: Varies.

In Summer 2018 - Spanish 65.08: War Pics: Photography in 19th Century Latin American Conflicts.

This course focuses on the history and uses of photographic images in Latin America during armed conflicts in the 19th century. We will analyze the impact of photographic records during the American Civil War (Alexander Gardner), the Paraguayan War (George Bate), the War of Canudos (Victor Torres), the Argentinean “Conquest of the Desert” (Juan Pi), and the War of the Pacific. We will also explore the works on photography by Roland Barthes, Jacques Rancière, and Georges Didi-Huberman among others, as well as Latin American visual theorists such as Jens Andermann, Robert Levine, Beatriz González-Stephan, and Miguel Angel Cuarterolo. Dist:ART; WCult:NW. Professor: Sebastian Díaz.

In Spring 2019 - Spanish 65.09: Performeras on the Latin American Stage.

This course provides an overview of women's dramatic writing and cultural expression from Latin America and considers how these texts intersect, reflect, disrupt or resist canonical literary movements in Latin American tradition. Course content includes traditional dramatic forms as well as non-literary, visual and performative forms of expression.  By examining works of very diverse ranges, we will also challenge society’s and the authors’ conceptualizations of Latin American women as a way to critique underlying issues of race, class, gender, and other power structures. Dist:ART; WCult:NW. Professor: Analola Santana.

In Summer 2019- Spanish 65.11: Archive Fever: Cultures and Knowledge in an Unequal World

To achieve an advanced and nuanced understanding of the role of archives for cultural diversity and knowledge circulation, paying specific attention to digital transformation in contexts of knowledge asymmetries. (1) Understand patterns and developments of the geopolitics of knowledge from the perspective of Latin America and the Caribbean; (2) Get to know processes  and practices  of  “archives” (libraries, museums, archives in the stricter sense);(3) Discuss the outcomes  and the implications of digital transformation; (4) Bridge theory and practice via concrete archival experiences. Professor Spitta and Göbel. 

In Fall 2019- Spanish 65.06: Crossing the US- Mexico Border: Myths and Icons of Hybridity

The US-Mexico border is both a vital zone of contact and a death zone between two of the most diverse and vibrant cultures in the Americas. We will study how border writers, artists, and filmmakers from both sides of the border represent that in-between space that some argue is fast becoming a third nation. Readings and films will include Eduardo Parra, Tierra de nadie, Crosthwaite, La luna siempre será un difícil amor, Campbell’s Tijuana, Rosina Conde’s internet novel La genara, and María Novaro’s film Sin dejar huella, Rubén Martínez, Crossing Over, among others. Readings will be in Spanish and English. Dist: NW; Lit/CI. Professor Silvia Spitta

In Spring 2020- Spanish 65.10: Performing Latin American Identities

What meanings are produced when we invite others to look at our bodies? How do these meanings change when our bodies are live, on stage, as opposed to on film or in printed literature? How do we change when we look at others' live bodies? To begin to answer these questions, we will examine the ways in which identities and power are (re)presented through live, deliberate performance as well as the multiple ways in which “performative texts” can be found. This course focuses on cultural production in relation to contemporary sites of identity politics, and as such we will analyze theoretical texts (such as Richard Schechner, Diana Taylor, and Josefina Alcazar), theatrical works (Yuyachkani, Jesusa Rodríguez, Teatro de los Andes, etc.), watch videos of live performances (from the folkloric, to the political, to the artistic), as well as read more traditional texts (novel, short-story, news, etc.). This course engages cultural theory, visual art, film, performance, literature, and activist interventions that illuminate the human impact and costs that characterize contemporary identity politics. This will lead us to formulate questions that invite us to think about gender, race, and the construction of Latin American identities in contemporary times. Dist:CI; ART. Professor Analola Santana. 

SPAN 70: Great Works of Hispanic Literature: Don Quixote and One Hundred Years of Solitude

Few novels of the Hispanic world have had greater resonance than Cervantes’ Don Quijote (published between 1605 and 1615) and Gabriel García Márquez’ Cien años de soledad (1969). Both have continually fascinated their readers and provoked myriad interpretations and reinterpretations. This course seeks to understand each text as an autonomous work of literature and as a highly creative response to the literary and cultural forces in which it was forged. Individual offerings of this course will focus on one of these literary masterpieces. Spanish courses numbered 40 and above may be repeated for credit when offered as different topics. Prerequisite: SPAN 20. Dist: LIT; WCult: Varies.

In Spring 2019 - Spanish 70.01: Don Quijote.

From the time of its publication in 1605 (Part I) and 1615 (Part II), Don Quijote has provoked radically different interpretations. Taking as point of departure both the comic and the romantic interpretation, the course will explore, in the first place, the meaning of the Quijote across the centuries. Parallely the course seeks to understand the Quijote both per se--as an autonomous work of literature--and as a highly creative response to the literary and cultural forces from which it was forged. In addition to explore the historical context, such as social conflicts in the Hapsburg monarchy, in order to make understand better the work, the course will attend also to the literary history, and will offer an approach to novel as literary genre, product of the Medieval “mixtification” which flourished in the Renaissance. Dist:LIT; WCult:W. Professor Isabel Lozano.

SPAN 73: Special Topics in Hispanic Literary and Cultural Production

This course is offered periodically with varying content so that writers, genres, historical contexts, or theoretical approaches not otherwise provided in the curriculum may be studied. The course can be offered any term and its distinct content, theoretical, or methodological approach will depend on the area of specialization of the instructor. Spanish courses numbered 40 and above may be repeated for credit when offered as different topics. Prerequisite: SPAN 20. Dist: LIT; WCult: Varies.

In Spring 2019 - Spanish 73.07: Outsiders: The Aesthetics of Deviance in Contemporary Argentina.

In sociology, deviance describes an action or behavior that violates social norms. This course will explore recent Argentine literature, film, comics, music, and contemporary art where the character does not conform to the society's norms and is subsequently alienated, ostracized, socially sanctioned, discriminated against or persecuted. The course will also examine the figure of the outsider artist. Typically, those labeled as outsider artists have little or no contact with the mainstream art world or art institutions. In many cases, their work is discovered only after their deaths. Theoretical framework by Agamben, Becker, Deleuze, Foucault, Nietzsche. Dist.: Professor: Julio Ariza.

In Fall 2019- Spanish 73.04: Todo Borges

Jorge Luis Borges is one of the most difficult and influential Latin American writers. His fascination with labyrinths, mirrors, time, infinity, blindness, and memory are legendary. We will spend the term reading as much as we can of Borges: his stories, detective fiction, poetry, correspondence, and speeches. We will also study his literary trajectory including his influences, which stem from far and wide (Cervantes, Kafka, Poe, Chesterton, Schopenhauer), his “forgeries,” his editorial work, literary criticism as well as reflections by his critics and the works of some of the writers whom he influenced. Students will be required to trace some of his legendary (real and imaginary) arcane sources. Borges critically and playfully embodies "world literature" while at the same time considering the role of Argentine literature within the complex network of transnational literature. Dist:NW; LIT. Professor Silvia Spitta

In Winter 2020- Spanish 73.08: Nietzche in Argentine Literature

This course will analyze the ubiquitous presence of the work of the German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche in Argentine literature. The reception of the Nietzschean texts generated a wide variety of literary production: articles in magazines and early translations at the beginning of the 20th century; a notorious influence on the disillusioned modernism of Leopoldo Lugones; essays by the thinker Ezequiel Martínez Estrada; existential novels by Ernésto Sábato; fantastic fictions with spatio-temporal speculations by Adolfo Bioy Casares and Jorge Luis Borges; and, among other writings, realistic novels of the post-crisis of 2001, such as those of Juan José Becerra and Gustavo Ferreyra. Dist: NW; LIT. Professor Juilio Ariza. 

In Spring 2020- Spanish 73.09: George Ticknor '1807: The Legacy of a Dartmouth Hispanist'

Two hundred years ago, George Ticknor returned to Boston after a life-changing four-year period of study (Germany) and travel (Spain, Portugal, France) in Europe. He accepted a position at Harvard University as the first professor of Romance Languages, a position that allowed him to integrate the study of Spanish, Portuguese and French into the core curriculum. In 1849, he published his influential History of Spanish Literature, a work that set the foundation for the modern study of the literature and culture of Spain. This course will explore the life and writings of this outstanding Dartmouth alumnus, as well as its legacy in the 21st Century. Dist: W; LIT. Professor José del Pino.

SPAN 75: Creative Writing in Spanish

This course offers a workshop in creative writing to be taught by prominent writers in residence in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese. It is designed for native speakers of Spanish, heritage speakers, and Spanish majors in their junior or senior years. Seminar-sized class meets twice or three times a week plus individual conferences when necessary. The class will consist of group workshops on student writing (fiction, poetry, and/or theater) and individual conferences with the instructor. Students will be admitted on a competitive basis and should submit a short writing sample of poetry, fiction, and/or a play to the Department’s Administrator prior to obtaining permission to enroll. The limit for this class is 14. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

Spanish 77: Text and Contexts. Topics in Writing

This course is designed to help students develop excellence in writing as they prepare for upper level literature and culture courses in Spanish. Topics will vary according to term and faculty as well as the "texts" studied in the course (literary, filmic, cultural, and visual). Given that thinking, reading, and writing are interdependent activities, Spanish 77 is designed to offer students an opportunity to study a topic of interest in Hispanic literature or culture while simultaneously emphasizing the advanced writing skills required of a research paper. Frequent exercises in writing and close textual study are basic to this course. Prerequisite: Spanish 20 or permission of instructor. (PDF). Dist: LIT; WCult: W.

Spanish 80: Senior Seminar in Hispanic Studies

The capstone seminar in Hispanic Studies is designed to provide our majors with a small- group research and creative setting.  Students will be encouraged to explore a core problem that will guide their research and creative intervention throughout the term.  Conceived as a research laboratory, i.e., as a dynamic and experimental context, students will interactively develop a wide array of final projects.  Essay writing, visual arts explorations, performance pieces, photography, blogs, graphic novels, or short films are some examples of potential culminating projects.  The capstone seminar is open to senior majors, senior minors and modified majors.

In Spring 2018 - Senior Seminar (Latin America).

The capstone seminar in Hispanic Studies is designed to provide our majors with a small- group research and creative setting.  Students will be encouraged to explore a core problem that will guide their research and creative intervention throughout the term.  Conceived as a research laboratory, i.e., as a dynamic and experimental context, students will interactively develop a wide array of final projects.  Essay writing, visual arts explorations, performance pieces, photography, blogs, graphic novels, or short films are some examples of potential culminating projects.  Dist:LIT. Professor: Analola Santana.

In Winter 2019 -Spanish 80.15: Indignant Spain: Crisis and New Social Movements Today.

Indignant Spain is a Humanities Lab course that examines the notion of "crisis" as a creative paradigm for rethinking traditional experiences of the political, social, and cultural spheres in today's Spain. The course focuses on the deep connections between democracy and alternative ways of thinking about the political participation of citizens confronting the dismantling of their social, family, and individual welfare by global and national neoliberal economic and social policies.  The course examines the economic situation that led to the 2008 global economic meltdown, the Spanish government's response to the economic crisis, and the effects it had on all areas of Spanish civic life.  The course pays special attention to the social and solidarity movements that the 15-M movement sparked in Spain and internationally in Greece and France and also as a precursor to the US Occupy movement by examining the global erosion of justice, the rise of social inequities and the lack of global responses to what are international webs of economic and social challenges.  However, the course also spends a good amount of time studying the exhilarating moment of transformation all moments of crisis offer (animal rights, collaborative economic theory, the "Common" movement, Catalunya's push for independence, etc.).   Students will explore a wide variety of cultural texts and learn how to formulate their own responses through a series of hands-on experiential projects. Professor: Annabel Martín. 

In Spring 2019-Spanish 80.16: Planeta Paraguay. Power and Poetics of a “land without evil.”

Guarani peoples in what later became Paraguay believed there was a promised land, Yvymarae´ÿ, or the “land without evil”. Ironically, ever since the Conquest and through modern times Paraguay struggled with internal and external political powers that contributed to the country’s insularity, exploitation and impoverishment. Planeta Paraguay invites seniors to study a lesser known country from Latin America as a starting point to produce their own projects about Latin American social movements for liberation, revolution and quests for liberty in a “land without evil”. Professor Sebastían Díaz.

In Fall 2019- Spanish 80.14: Slaves From the Past, Slaves Next Door

This course will deal with human bondage. It will try to address a fundamental question: under what circumstances and through what strategies does a human being strip another human being of his/her humanity? From Columbus to Almodóvar we will use modern theories of human domination/bondage —starting with Hegel, Nietzsche’s theorization of the master-slave dynamics —as we explore slavery and different forms of human bondage in literature and films. Readings for the course may include, among other materials, texts from Columbus, Cuneo, Hegel, Nietzsche, Manzano, Carpentier, Rulfo and García Márquez, as well as films by Pontecorvo, Almodóvar, and Bollaín. Dist:W; Lit/CI. Professor Beatríz Pastor. 

In Winter 2020- Spanish 80.17: Spain Reset! Rethinking Democracy and Culture

The purpose of this course is to map the ways in which three distinct autonomous communities, the Basque Country, Catalonia, and Madrid have reconfigured the articulation of their civic identities by making the cities of Bilbao, Barcelona, and Madrid the centerpieces of their cultural and political renewal. Bilbao will serve as the example by which globalization, high architectural art forms, and national narratives become part of a project of economic, urban, and cultural renewal. The Frank O. Gehry design of the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao will serve as the centerpiece for these discussions. Barcelona will be studied under the lens of its recent push to independence and its confrontation with the Spanish state. We will contrast this situation with another "state" re-imagining that took place with the projects of urban renewal and internationalization that the 1992 Summer Olympics made possible. Madrid will be studied through the lens of crisis and change as we look at the economic situation that led to the 2008 economic meltdown, the Spanish government's response to the economic crisis, and the social and solidarity movements that the 15-M movement sparked in Spain. We will be reading political theory, philosophical texts, cultural studies, novels, theater, graphic novels (comics), and films to highlight how the cultural field is intimately engaged with these topics. Dist: W;LIT. Professor Annabel Martín.

In Spring 2020- Spanish 80.05: Senior Seminar in Hispanic Studies

The capstone seminar in Hispanic Studies is designed to provide our majors with a small- group research and creative setting. Students will be encouraged to explore a core problem that will guide their research and creative intervention throughout the term. Conceived as a research laboratory, i.e., as a dynamic and experimental context, students will interactively develop a wide array of final projects. Essay writing, visual arts explorations, performance pieces, photography, blogs, graphic novels, or short films are some examples of potential culminating projects. The capstone seminar is open to senior majors, senior minors and modified majors. Professor Rebecca Biron. 

SPAN 83: Independent Study

A program of individual study directed by a member of the Spanish and Portuguese faculty. Spanish 83 will normally consist of a program of reading and research that is not covered in regularly scheduled course offerings. After consultation with the faculty advisor of the project, all Independent Study proposals must be submitted for approval to the Department. Only open to majors in Spanish or Romance Languages. Under normal circumstances, no student may receive credit for this course more than once. Students interested in pursuing and Independent Study must identify their topic and faculty advisor by the last week of the term prior to registering for Spanish 83. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

SPAN 90: Honors Course

Supervised independent research under the direction of a designated advisor. Honors majors will normally elect this course as the first in the required sequence (90 and 91) for completion of the Honors Program. SPAN 90 is intended to prepare the student for writing the Honors thesis, through readings in primary and secondary texts, theory and methodology. The course will include periodic written assignments and culminate in a final paper. Prerequisite: Admission to the Honors Program.

SPAN 91: Honors Seminar

A prearranged program of study and research during any term of the senior year, on a tutorial basis, with individual faculty members (normally the thesis advisor). A thesis and public presentation are the expected culmination of the course. Prerequisite: Prior admission to the Department's Honors Program; clear evidence of capability to perform honors level work, normally indicated by completion of SPAN 90 with a grade of B+ or higher.