Language and Culture

SPAN 1: Spanish I

Introduction to spoken and written Spanish. Intensive study of introductory grammar and vocabulary with a focus on culture. Oral class activities, readings and compositions. Weekly practice in the virtual language lab includes viewing TV series and films and weekly drill sessions. Never serves in partial satisfaction of the Distributive or World Culture Requirements.

Sample Syllabus

SPAN 2: Spanish II

Continuation of SPAN 1. Further intensive study of grammar and vocabulary with a focus on culture. Oral class activities, readings and compositions and continued practice in the virtual language laboratory. Weekly drill sessions. Never serves in partial satisfaction of the Distributive or World Culture Requirements. Open to first-year students by qualifying test and to others who have passed SPAN 1.

Sample Syllabus

SPAN 3: Spanish III

Continuation of SPAN 2. SPAN 3 provides additional, intensive study of grammar and vocabulary with a focus on literature and culture. Oral class activities, readings and compositions and continued practice in the virtual language laboratory. Weekly drill sessions. Completion of this course on campus or as part of the LSA constitutes fulfillment of the language requirement. Never serves in partial satisfaction of the Distributive or World Culture Requirements. Open to first-year students by qualifying test and to others who have passed SPAN 2.

Winter and Spring 2022; Winter 2023 - LSA Barcelona

Spring 2022 - LSA Buenos Aires

Summer 2022 - LSA Santander

Sample Syllabus

SPAN 5: (Language Study Abroad)

Taught in the context of the Language Study Abroad program, this course in Hispanic culture reinforces listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills in Spanish. The thematic focus is on local and regional art history, with special emphasis on the city as a dynamic form of cultural production through time. Attending to political, social, economic, and religious contexts, the course features brief presentations by local personnel as well as relevant field trips. Assignments include conversation, writing projects, oral presentations, and a final course examination. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Dartmouth Language Study Abroad Program. Dist: WCult: W (Spain), NW (Buenos Aires).

Winter and Spring 2022; Winter 2023 - LSA Barcelona

Spring 2022 - LSA Buenos Aires

SPAN 6: (Language Study Abroad)

Taught in the context of the Language Study Abroad program, this introductory course in Hispanic literature strengthens listening, reading, speaking and writing skills in Spanish. The reading materials are selected to help students develop their analytical strategies as well as to expose them to relevant cultural issues and major figures of the region in which they are studying. Assigned work may include brief research papers, oral presentations, a mid-term exam and a final course examination. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Dartmouth Language Study Abroad Program. Dist: LIT; WCult: W (Spain), NW (Buenos Aires).

Winter and Spring 2022; Winter 2023 - LSA Barcelona

Spring 2022 - LSA Buenos Aires

SPAN 7: First-Year Seminars in Spanish and Spanish-American Literature

The First-year Seminar Program serves four purposes. First, by means of a uniform writing requirement, the seminar stresses the importance of written expression in all disciplines. Second, it provides an attractive and exciting supplement to the usual introductory survey. Third, it guarantees each first-year student at least one small course. Fourth, the program engages each first-year student in the research process, offering an early experience of the scholarship that fuels Dartmouth's upper-level courses.

In Winter 2022 - Spanish 7: Streaming Latin America.

What visions of Latin America can emerge and circulate on a streaming platform? How do contemporary onscreen narratives consolidate or contest ideas about gender, Indigeneity, social mobility, and political upheaval in countries from Colombia to Mexico? This course examines Netflix's Latin American films and series in order to ask these questions and others while also paying close attention to how the streaming giant risks reproducing imperialist logics--and where exactly room for resistance can surface. As we combine textual analysis with research into the creative choices that lie behind production practices, students will develop convincing arguments in assignments that range from short weekly responses to a longer final paper. Films will include I'm No Longer Here and The Edge of Democracy, while series will include Green Frontier and 3%. The course concludes with an investigation of the Argentine Lumiton platform, whose local model suggests an alternative to the U.S.-based Netflix. Professor Martina Broner.

SPAN 9: Culture and Conversation: Advanced Spanish Language

This course serves as a bridge between SPAN 3 and SPAN 20. Through the intensive study of a variety of aural media (e.g., documentaries, TV and radio programs, films), grammar, vocabulary and speech acts as presented in the course packet, students will actively practice listening and speaking skills with the goal of reaching an Intermediate High Level (on the ACTFL scale). Additional written material may be added according to the professor's particular interests. Prerequisite: SPAN 3; AP Lang 4 or AP Lit 4; local placement test 600+, or permission of the instructor. It serves as a prerequisite for SPAN 20.

Sample Syllabus

SPAN 15: LatinX Writing and Composition

This course draws on the strengths of Latinx Language Learners in order to enhance their skills in writing and composition. Using a variety of media and genres, students will explore the cultural experiences of US Latinx communities and the Spanish-speaking world. Students will write essays, narrative prose, and creative literary works that focus on structures related to languages and cultures in contact, as well as review grammar to expand their range from informal to academic communication. Students will also develop experiential learning projects throughout the term and participate in events around campus related to Spanish-speaking communities. This course can be used to fulfill the language requirement. It serves as pre-requisite for Spanish 20. May not be taken in conjunction with Spanish 9.

Advanced Language, Literature, and Cultural Studies

SPAN 20: Writing and Reading: A Critical and Cultural Approach

SPAN 20 is the first course of the Major/Minor, and serves as transition between the skills acquired through the Spanish language courses (Spanish LSA or equivalent preparation) and those needed for all upper-division courses (30 and above). Through the study of critical and theoretical vocabulary, and the reading of short stories, poems, films, theatrical plays and journalistic articles, students will acquire analytic tools to comprehend and analyze several types of texts. This course is also designed to familiarize students with different textual genres and a wide array of literary and interpretative key concepts. Prerequisite: Participation in one of the Spanish LSA programs; SPAN 9 or 15; exemption from SPAN 9 based on test scores (see Department web site); or permission of instructor. SPAN 20 may be taken in conjunction with 30-level survey courses. It serves as a prerequisite for all Spanish courses 40 and higher. Dist: LIT.

Sample Syllabus

SPAN 21: Historical and Current Debates in Argentine Culture (LSA+)

This course offers an introduction to the Argentine culture through four debates that expressed and continue to outline Argentina's quest for its own definition of a national identity. Many have named these debates true "Argentine Passions:" the antagonism between Buenos Aires and the rest of the Provinces; the myth of the "melting pot" and the role of immigration; political activism and the place of "youth" in the political arena (Peronism, Dictatorship, and the 2001 Crises); and the connections between Argentina's politics and culture and Latin America. The course program is coordinated with a variety of cultural visits and excursions that are an intrinsic part of its content. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Dartmouth Spanish LSA+ and Spanish 9. Dist: SOC WCult: NW.

SPAN 22: Modern and Contemporary Spanish Artistic and Cultural Production (L.S.A.+)

This course will make students fluent in some of the main topics relevant to modern and contemporary Spanish cultural production, with a particular emphasis on Northern Spain.  The course will not count towards the major or minor. Dist: ART; WCult: W.

SPAN 23: Argentine Cultural Heritage (FSP)

This course deepens the student's knowledge of the Argentine art and cultures through the study and discussion of the visual, architectural and plastic arts, as well as music and performance. The materials will expose the students to the main trends and topics of contemporary Argentine art, cultures and society. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program, Argentina. Dist: ART; WCult: NW.

Spring 2022 and Spring 2023 - FSP Buenos Aires

SPAN 24: Spanish Cultural Heritage (FSP)

This course deepens the student's knowledge of the Spanish art and cultures through the study and discussion of the visual, architectural and plastic arts, as well as music and performance. The materials will expose the students to the main trends and topics of contemporary Spanish art, cultures and society. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program, Spain. Dist: ART; WCult: W.

Winter 2022 and Fall 2022 - FSP Madrid

SPAN 30: Introduction to Hispanic Studies I: Middle Ages to 17th Century

This course presents an overview of major literary trends and cultural productions from the Middle Ages to the 17th century in both their Spanish and Spanish American contexts. Students will read a representative selection of major literary works from that period, both Peninsular and Spanish-American, and discuss theoretical, aesthetic, and critical issues pertinent to the Renaissance, the Baroque, colonialism, syncretism, etc. Texts may also be cultural, visual, and/or filmic. Prerequisite: SPAN 20. Dist: LIT; WCult: W.

SPAN 31: Introduction to Hispanic Studies II: 18th and 19th Centuries

This course presents a chronological study of major trans-Atlantic literary trends and cultural productions, corresponding to the cultural and aesthetic movements of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Students will read a representative selection of major literary works, both Peninsular and Spanish-American, from that period and discuss theoretical, aesthetic, and critical issues pertinent to modernity, empire, enlightenment, nationalism, gender, democracy, etc. Texts may also be, cultural, visual, and/or filmic. Prerequisite: SPAN 20. Dist: LIT; WCult: W.

SPAN 32: Introduction to Hispanic Studies III: 20th - 21st Centuries

This course presents a chronological study of trans-Atlantic major literary trends and cultural productions, corresponding to the cultural and aesthetic movements from the 1880s to the present. Students will read a representative selection of major literary works from that period, both Peninsular and Spanish-American, and discuss theoretical, aesthetic, and critical issues pertinent to modernismo, the avant-garde, revolution, post-modernism, etc. Texts may also be cultural, visual, and/or filmic. Prerequisite: SPAN 20. Dist: LIT; WCult: W.

SPAN 33: Argentine Civilization: Society, Culture, and Politics in Argentina (FSP)

This course studies socio-political events in the Southern Cone that have shaped the contemporary configuration of society in Argentina. Emphasis will be placed on key political figures, social movements, oppositional tensions, dictatorship and democracy, and their articulation in the cultural field. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program. Dist: SOC; WCult: NW.

Spring 2022 and Spring 2023 - FSP Buenos Aires

SPAN 34: Society, Culture and Politics in Spain (FSP)

This courses studies socio-political events in the Iberian Peninsula that have shaped the contemporary configuration of society in Spain. Emphasis will be placed on key political figures, social movements, oppositional tensions, dictatorship and democracy, and their articulation in the cultural field. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program, Spain. Dist: SOC; WCult: W.

Winter 2022 and Fall 2022 - FSP Madrid

SPAN 35: Studies in Spanish-American Literature and Culture (FSP)

This course is designed to offer students an opportunity to study a topic of interest in Spanish American literature and culture through the reading of a wide variety of literary and cultural texts. Emphasis will be placed on Argentina and the Southern Cone. Topics may vary. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program, Argentina. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW.

Spring 2022 and Spring 2023 - FSP Buenos Aires

SPAN 36: Studies in Modern and Contemporary Spanish Literature and Culture (FSP)

This course is designed to offer students an opportunity to study a topic of interest in the literature's and cultures of Spain through the reading of a wide variety of literary and cultural texts. Topics may vary. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program, Spain. Dist: LIT; WCult: W.

Winter 2022 and Fall 2022 - FSP Madrid

SPAN 40: Hispanic Literature and Culture by Period

This course will focus on the study of the significant historical periods and cultural movements of the Hispanic world. It is organized according to chronological eras that are marked by distinct cultural and literary movements. Areas covered will be the Middle Ages, the culture of the Renaissance and the Baroque, the Colonial Period, Enlightenment and Modernity, Nineteenth-Century Romanticism and Realism, the Avant-Gardes, Post-modernism, and new developments in the contemporary period. One or more periods will be selected for study. Spanish courses numbered 40 and above may be repeated for credit when offered as different topics. Prerequisite: SPAN 20.

In Fall 2021 - Spanish 40.12: "Cosas de ninos." Representations of Children in Modern Spanish Culture.

Children have always been a constant in literary and visual representations of all times, from the picaresque novel to court paintings where infants occupy a central role. However, it is in the 18th century, with the formation of the modern state, that infancy begins to be approached as an autonomous category and as a cultural concern. Since then, it has been widely studied by different disciplines, from philosophy to sociology, medicine, psychology and the arts. Along with readings by Freud and Rousseau that will help us shape the modern concept of infancy, this course will explore the representation of children in modern Spanish literature and culture as a way to address a number of controversial issues that are brought to our attention by way of the children's universe: war and revolution; the failures of the education system; nature vs. nurture; the crisis of traditional political institutions; the shortcomings of medicine, the challenges of modernity, the emergence of a popular consciousness; or the role of women. Dist.: LIT; WCult: W. Professor Sara Muñoz.

In Spring 2022 - Spanish 40.07: Dark Mirror: Spanish Detective Fiction.

This course examines Spanish contemporary society through the dissecting lens of one of the most popular literary subgenres: detective fiction or crime novel. Starting with some early examples, we will read and analyze short stories and novels published from the end of the Spanish Civil War (1939) to present. Authors will include Francisco García Pavón, Manuel Vázquez Montalbán, Javier Marías, Antonio Muñoz Molina, Lorenzo Silva, and Alicia Giménez Bartlett. Dist.: LIT; WCult: W. Professor José del Pino.

In Summer 2022 - Spanish 40.06: Love and All That Comes With It.

This course will trace the literary constructions, elaborations, and treatments of love in Spanish literature from the 18th to the beginning of the 20th century. The psychological and sociological implications and the cultural significance of love will be explored in a variety of art forms –drama, poetry, novel and opera— paying special attention to the representation of other literary topics that are inexorably attached to love: adultery, betrayal, incest, prostitution, and (in)fidelity. Readings include erotic poems by Samaniego and Meléndez Valdés, Espronceda's El estudiante de Salamanca and "Canto a Teresa," Bécquer's Rimas y leyendas, Zorrilla's Don Juan, Clarín's La Regenta, Galdós' Tristana and Valle-Inclán's Sonata de otoño. Dist.: LIT; WCult: W. Professor Sara Muñoz.

In Fall 2022 - Spanish 40.13: The "Spanish Craze": Cultural Bridges Between Spain and the United States.

This course explores the cultural exchange between Spain and the United States, starting at the beginning of the 19th century until the contemporary period. During a time when the new American republic was establishing itself politically and culturally, many writers and intellectuals engage in a dialectic relationship with the Hispanic world. Spain will become a point of reference for Romantic travelers and historians like Washington Irving, literary scholars like George Ticknor, and philanthropists like Archer M. Huntington. The course will examine how Hispanic art, music, food, and film has permeated high and low culture in the United States, as well as the role of stereotypes of the Hispanic character and the controversial legacy of the Spanish colonization of the Americas. Dist.: LIT; WCult: W. Professor José del Pino.

Spanish 43: Hispanic Literature and Culture by Genre

A literary genre is defined as an established category of written work employing a set of recognizable common conventions, such as technique, style, structure or subject matter. This course will focus on the study of Hispanic literatures and cultures and is organized around one or more basic genres like poetry, drama, novel, and essay. Other articulating categories for the course may include epic poetry, tragic drama, short-fiction narrative, the picaresque novel, and the melodrama, among others. The course will provide students with the appropriate critical vocabulary to understand the specificity of the genre or sub-genre examined in this course. Prerequisite: SPAN 20.

In Summer 2021 - Spanish 43.06: Tango Argentino. Music, Dance, Poetry, and Community.

Since its birth the Argentine tango continues to be a complex art form with popular roots and international reach beyond the Southern Cone. The tango has stood the test of time as a form of popular culture that many consider a lifestyle, a religion, and a worldview. Since it is at once a type of music, a dance, a distinctive type of poetry and a community (social dance or milonga), the tango requires a variety of disciplines to interpret it. This course will provide students with tools to understand tango as music, poetry, dance, language (lunfardo), and melodrama, from the 19th century to its current state of political resistance and globalized commodification. The course will have an experiential component to allow space for listening to the music and learning basic tango salón footwork with invited guests. Dist: ART; WCult NW. Professor Noelia Cirnigliaro.

Spanish 45: Regional/National/Trans-Atlantic Approaches to Hispanic Studies

This course studies the complex intersections between literatures, languages, cultures and their national, regional, and trans-Atlantic contexts in Spain, Latin America, and the US.  In this course, literary and cultural expressions are studied in relation to place in a wide array of historical contexts.  Issues may include literature and colonialism, "indigenismo," the city/country dialectic, regional and national languages and cultural interdependence, the arts as buffers of political/nationalistic violence, national borders and cultural identity, and the formation of national literatures. Prerequisite: SPAN 20.

In Fall 2021:

Spanish 45.05: The Stolen Children of Argentina and Spain.

In this seminar we will analyze compare and contrast how Argentina and Spain work preserving and dealing with the horrors of the past. We will study theories of memory and trauma and how novels, films, and performances convey the experience of violence, stolen identity, and the search of parents for their lost children and the children's search for their lost parents. Which languages and which images are used in Spain to reveal publically the crimes that had been hidden for so long? Which similarities and differences can be found in the transatlantic comparison to Argentina? Dist: ART; WCult CI. Professor Silvia Spitta.

Spanish 45.07: Slaves From the Past, Slaves Next Door.

This course will deal with human bondage. It will try to address a fundamental question: Under what circumstances and through what strategies does a human being strip another human being of his/her humanity? From Columbus to Almodóvar we will use modern theories of human domination/bondage —Hegel and Nietzsche's theorization of the master-slave dynamics —as we explore slavery and human bondage trough history in literature and films.

Materials for the course will include readings from Columbus, Hegel, Nietzsche, Manzano, Gomez de Avellaneda, Carpentier and García Márquez, as well as films by Spielberg, Pontecorvo, Almodóvar, y Bollaín. Dist: INT; WCult CI. Professor Beatriz Pastor.

Spanish 50: Gender and Sexuality in Hispanic Studies

This course will explore how the study of gender and sexuality is integral to understanding the complexities of Hispanic societies and cultures. In addition to analyzing literary texts and cultural and artistic productions, students will also examine theoretical and critical approaches to the study of gender and sexuality. Topics may include feminist movements, the construction and performance of gender, the theories as they relate to Hispanic embodiments and representations in literature and culture. Prerequisite: SPAN 20.

In Summer 2021 - Spanish 50.04: Let's Not Talk About It. Eroticism in Modern Spain.

Erotic literature in Spain has often been dismissed as inferior, offensive and taboo. However, many of these materials circulated clandestinely and found their way to underground publications. By exploring literary works, engravings, photographs, and films, this course intends to concentrate on the erotic nature of a number of Spanish cultural works starting from the 18th to the mid-20th century in which the obscene, the pornographic and the erotic serve as platform to discuss other issues such as gender politics, gendered relations, Iberian humor, social marginalization, race, identity, and the concept of Spanishness. Dist: LIT; WCult W. Professor Sara Muñoz.

In Winter 2023 - Spanish 50.01: Of Machos and Malinches.

This course examines how gender and sexuality align with or contest local discourses on Latin/o American cultural autochthony and national identity, and explores gender and sexuality in the context of global culture and transnationalism. We will also analyze how gender and sexual identities are articulated in language, performance, and visual and aural media. Along with primary literary texts, film, art, and music, students will engage with scholarly texts that contextualize the historical, cultural, and linguistic traditions from which gender and sexual identities emerge, as well as those critical and theoretical interventions that deconstruct essentialist notions of the body and scrutinize the political implications of oppositional discourses on gender and sexuality. Dist.: LIT; WCult.: CI. Professor Israel Reyes.

In Spring 2023 - Spanish 50.02: Sexual and Social Identity in Film and Literature in Post-Franco Spain.

This course addresses changes in Spanish society since the end of the dictatorship.  These include the relativization of family, love, drugs, sexuality, life, death, and democracy; and the devaluation of morals, history, and culture.  Authors include Vázquez Montalbán, Marías, Loriga, Montero, Riera, Almodóvar, de la Iglesia, Amenábar, and Balagueró. Dist: LIT; WCult W. Professor Txetxu Aguado.

SPAN 53: Topics in Spanish Linguistics, Rhetoric, and Poetics

The focus of study for this course will be the evolution of the Spanish language from its old and early modern manifestations to contemporary uses. Specific geographical contexts will be given special attention. Topics may include the constitution of Castilian as a national language and its relation to other peninsular languages; the history of linguistic change on all levels (phonetic/phonological, morphological, syntactic, and semantic); the influence of Arabic, indigenous languages of the Americas, English, and dialectal variants. Fundamental notions of rhetoric and poetics will be central to this course as well. Spanish courses numbered 40 and above may be repeated for credit when offered as different topics. Prerequisite: SPAN 20.

In Winter 2022 - Spanish 53.01: History of Spanish Language.

The objective of this course is to understand the origins of different linguistic phenomena and the variations of Spanish by exploring its history and geography. We will trace how Spanish derived from Latin, with particular regard for phonological and morpho-syntax development, and we will analyze the differences between Spanish as it is currently spoken in Spain and across Latin America. Dist.: INT, LIT; WCult: W. Professor Isabel Lozano.

Spanish 55: Hispanic Literature, Culture, and Politics

This is an interdisciplinary course that studies through diverse representations in literature and the arts major sociopolitical realities that have shaken and transformed the Hispanic world such as the Conquest, colonialism, the rise of the modern nation states, the Mexican and Cuban revolutions, the Spanish Civil War, Latin America's "dirty" wars, etc.  The course will explore the interconnection between culture and politics allowing the student to read culture as a political text and political events as texts. Prerequisite: SPAN 20.

In Summer 2021 - Spanish 55.09: Revoltos/as: Forms of Rebellion and Revolution in Imperial Spain and Spanish America.

An indigenous rebellion helps overthrow a viceroy in Colonial Mexico; a woman in disguise joins the army and receives royal permission to live as a transgender male; a poet openly criticizes court politicians; a painter manages to question Catholic dogmas in his religious portraiture. It may be hard to imagine that there were multiple forms of rebellion and revolution under Absolutism in early modern Europe. But that is of course a prejudice from our modern times that need to be debunked in light of social attitudes towards power documented during that time period. We will explore salient cases from political revolution to subtle resistance in early modern texts and images of Spain and Spanish America. We will unearth impactful political upheavals as well as individual and collective forms of resistance relating gender, race, religion, etc., and forms of anti-establishment sentiment that occurred more often than we could imagine. Dist: ART; WCult NW. Professor Noelia Cirnigliaro.

In Winter 2022 - Spanish 55.06: Slaughterhouses. The Life and Death of Humans and Animals in the Southern Cone.

This course focuses on the slaughterhouse as an image that has haunted Latin American cultures for centuries, especially in the Southern Cone region. The image of the slaughterhouse for a society can be used to define, contrast, compare or put into question our own subjectivity for it highlights the flesh and blood that go into human labor At the same time, the image of the slaughterhouse denounces the abusive nature of power, a regulating force applied to bodies, both human and non-human. Using the image of the slaughterhouse in texts and images spanning 250 years of Southern cone history, we will explore various issues and debates within animal studies, from animal rights and biopolitics to modernization of killing, exploitation of bodies and zones of indetermination between animals and humans. Texts and images include: Echeverría, Lamborghini, Viñas, Walsh, Larra, Kohan, Busqued, Solanas, Sanjines, Foucault, Deleuze, Agamben and Giorgi. Dist.: SOC; WCult: NW. Professor Sebastián Díaz.

In Spring 2022 - Spanish 55.04: Humor and Politics in Latin American Literature, Film and Culture.

Comedy and humor often serve to undermine cultural elitism and denounce social injustice. Many Latin American authors, filmmakers, and artists have used comedy and humor in politically subversive ways, but also as a way to legitimize the cultures and communities of the marginal and disenfranchised. This course will explore several theories of humor as well as Latin American traditions of humor. Dist.: LIT; WCult: NW. Professor Israel Reyes.

In Summer 2022 - Spanish 55.13: Planeta Paraguay. Power and Politics in a "Land Without Evil."

Guarani peoples in what later became Paraguay believed there was a promised land, Yvymara'ey, or the "land without evil". Ironically, ever since the Conquest and through modern times Paraguay struggled with internal and external political powers that contributed to the country's insularity, exploitation, and impoverishment. By the end of Planeta Paraguay students will have stared to explore a lesser-known country from Latin America, to talk about images, texts, and films from some of the main figures of Paraguayan literature and culture. They will be able to discuss and analyze main problems of the ethical and political dimension of representation in Latin America. Students also will gain the disciplinary tools necessary to address such questions within the context of cultural, linguistic, and formal comparisons. Dist.: LIT; WCult.: NW. Professor Sebastián Díaz.

In Fall 2022 - Spanish 55.07: Revolution and Art in Mexico.

This course explores the cultural production of the Mexican Revolution (1910-1940) through an analysis of essays, literature, visual art, and cinema. It focuses on how the revolutionary ethos entered into relation with art, race, gender, religion and socialism in order to conceive a new social order and new forms of cultural imagination. The course content provides a clear understanding of the diverse set of interests and ideas that shaped the revolutionary process and continue to play an important role in contemporary Mexico. At the same time, the close examination of revolutionary representations sheds light on the problematic relations between aesthetics and politics, thought and praxis in modern societies. Works by Orozco, Rivera, Campobello, Vasconcelos, Flores Magón, Azuela, Maples Arce, among others. Dist.: ART; WCult.: NW. Professor Jorge Quintana-Navarrete.

In Winter 2023 - Spanish 55.11: Bullets and Letters: Basque Terrorism and the Arts.

This course will focus on Basque culture produced in response to ETA terrorism.  We will study the ideology that governs nationalist discourses, understand the relation between identity and violence, and find in the arts (literature, film, painting, and sculpture) a reason to make the humanities one of the legs upon which peace and reconciliation rest. Documents include interviews and writings by former ETA militants and understanding the final dissolution of the organization in 2018. Dist.: LIT; WCult.: W. Professor Annabel Martín.

SPAN 60: Race and Ethnicity in Hispanic Studies

A common misperception about race and ethnicity is that they are uniformly defined and that one region’s understanding of these terms is identical to any other. How are race and ethnicity conceptualized and represented in Spain, Latin America, and U.S. Latino communities? This course will examine the particular historical, regional, and cultural factors that give rise to different notions of race and ethnicity in the Hispanic world. Individual offerings of this course may focus on one or more of the following: Moorish Spain and the Reconquista; the Jewish Diaspora in Spain and Latin America; indigenous societies in Latin America; racial and cultural “mestizaje”; whiteness, racial purity, and “blanqueamiento”; slavery, the African Diaspora, and “afro-latinidades.” Spanish courses numbered 40 and above may be repeated for credit when offered as different topics. Prerequisite: SPAN 20.

SPAN 63: Hispanic Film Studies

Film and the visual arts in Spain, Latin America, and/or the US will be studied under different approaches in order to: understand the historical evolution of film making within these contexts; examine the different film genres (surrealism, neorealism, melodrama, film noir, Hollywood realism, animation, documentary, etc.) in their Hispanic contexts; study the body of work of renowned Latino, Spanish, and Latin American filmmakers and visual artists; analyze important cultural or historical events through their visual representations (the Mexican Revolution, the Spanish Civil War, the Cuban Revolution, end of Francoism, etc.); etc. Students will become familiar with relevant concepts in film analysis, film theory, and cultural studies and learn how issues of representation in the visual arts are linked to their literary counterparts. Spanish courses numbered 40 and above may be repeated for credit when offered as different topics. Prerequisite: SPAN 20.

In Winter 2022 - Spanish 63.10: Family Matters: Pedro Almodóvar, Gender Reversals, and New Communities.

Pedro Almodóvar Caballero, Spain's most internationally acclaimed and prize-winning filmmaker will be studied in this course for offering a rich counter-cultural filmography that is in deep dialogue with notions of freedom, creativity, contestation, and justice. Almodóvar's filmmaking, both in aesthetic and cultural terms, addresses issues which will appeal to students interested in understanding how culture, politics, and aesthetics get entangled in ways that "queer" gender identity, family structures, notions of community and the societal expectations and limitations surrounding them. The course will also compare his work with other contemporary filmmakers that have reconfigured in their films the boundaries of "family." Dist.: ART; WCult: CI. Professor Annabel Martín.

In Fall 2022:

Spanish 63.08: The Many Faces of Brazilian Cinema (crosslisted with PORT 63.08).

This course, directed to Spanish language students, aims to give a comprehensive vision of the richness and diversity of Brazil by introducing its culture and society through the study of Brazilian contemporary cinematic productions.  Topics include: The Other's gaze in Brazil, redefinition of national identity and history, reassessment of African and indigenous roots, concepts of good and evil, rural and urban violence, popular culture, and representations of race and gender. Class discussion also focuses on documentaries, reviews, and critical articles. The course is conducted in Spanish. All movies are shown in Portuguese with Spanish or English subtitles. This is the only Spanish/Portuguese cross-language course offered within the Department. Dist: ART; WCult: NW. Professor: Rodolfo Franconi.

Spanish 63.11: Blood Cinema. Spanish Movies from 1926 to 2019.

In this course, we will watch and discuss some canonical Spanish movies that deal with the literal and metaphorical topic of blood. In fact, blood will work in this class as a constelation of intertwined themes: war, sacrifice, redeption, punishment, revange, family bonds, vitalist excess, (destructive) passion, sexual desire, Catholic rituals, birth, martyrhood, biopolitics and national identity. Through the lens of the symbol of blood, we will tackle some of the most important political events and cultural problems that have conditioned modern Spanish history. We will also analyse the aesthetic keys and genre characteristics of this heterogenous geneology of films. One important and constant paradox students will confront in these movies is the vacillation between experimental, inovative and looking-forward formal strategies, and regressive subject matters and primitive taboos. Brief essays and excerpts from books will be weekly assigned in order to help student properly contextualize the audivisual works listed in this syllabus, as well as their directors and historical significance. Dist.: ART; WCult.: W. Professor Antonio Gómez.

In Winter 2023 - Spanish 63.12: Got Las Meninas? Spanish Visual Culture and Baroque Imaginaries.

Created in 1656 by the Spanish painter Diego Velázquez, 'Las meninas' is one of the greatest European paintings of all times, and by far one of the most analyzed, theorized, and adapted works of art in Modern history. Like many Spanish Baroque artifacts, 'Las Meninas' resembles a puzzle that calls for more than one strategy to assemble its pieces together. In this course students will approach El Prado Museum's most visited work using various strategies vis-à-vis literary classics from Baroque Spain and 20th/21st century scholarship on the Empire and Power, Domesticity, Gender and Sexuality, Court Life, Material Culture and Baroque art. We will also study textual and visual adaptations that rework some of Velázquez's obsessions. Our goal is to study political, cultural and practical contexts that shed light onto Velázquez's time and our own ways of interpreting it. Dist.: ART; WCult.: W. Professor Noelia Cirnigliaro.

In Spring 2023 - Spanish 63.01: Latin American Film.

In this survey of Latin American film we will study the Mexican Golden Age of film (1936-1969), Cuba's revolutionary film (Lucia) as well as other radical films of the 60s (Sangre del condor), and women's films. We will end looking at the most important production coming out of Latin America today such as the films of Francisco Lombardi, Claudia Llosa, Lucrecia Martel and others. We will also study important film manifestos. Dist.: ART; WCult.: NW. Professor Silvia Spitta.

SPAN 65: Hispanic Performance, Media, and the Arts

In our increasingly globalized society, what impact have transnationalism and new technologies had on the formation and articulation of local cultures in the Hispanic world? How do subjects remember and represent themselves as embodied actors in the spaces where conflicting and contestatory identities meet? How have television, the visual and graphic arts, and music redefined national space and identity in Spanish, Latin American, and U.S. Latino communities? Individual offerings of this course may focus on one or more of the following: theater, performance, and performativity; comics and the graphic arts; literature and the marketplace; the politics of mass media; sports and national identity; and popular culture's strategies of resistance. Spanish courses numbered 40 and above may be repeated for credit when offered as different topics. Prerequisite: SPAN 20.

In Spring 2022 - Spanish 65.15 : Cameras in Crisis.

How do we capture a crisis, and how do we respond to one? In such critical circumstances, what stories can cameras share? This course considers some of the visual and audiovisual responses that have emerged in the face of crises  from across 21st century Latin America. By carefully analyzing films and photographs, we will examine how artists interpret and even intervene in crises involving migration, the environment, political violence, gender rights, racism, and Indigeneity. As we contemplate narratives ranging from border crossings to the echoes of dictatorships to struggles against exploitative mining practices, we will pay special attention to production histories and always ask the following question: if a crisis demands a decision, how should we understand the creative choices made by filmmakers and photographers? Combining textual analysis with the study of artistic processes will also allow us to reflect on how images can simultaneously explore local crises and inspire transnational solidarity. Dist.: Art, World Cult:NW. Professor Martina Broner

SPAN 70: Great Works of Hispanic Literature: Don Quixote and One Hundred Years of Solitude

Few novels of the Hispanic world have had greater resonance than Cervantes' Don Quijote (published between 1605 and 1615) and Gabriel García Márquez' Cien años de soledad (1969). Both have continually fascinated their readers and provoked myriad interpretations and reinterpretations. This course seeks to understand each text as an autonomous work of literature and as a highly creative response to the literary and cultural forces in which it was forged. Individual offerings of this course will focus on one of these literary masterpieces. Spanish courses numbered 40 and above may be repeated for credit when offered as different topics. Prerequisite: SPAN 20.

In Fall 2021 - Spanish 70.01: Don Quijote.

From the time of its publication in 1605 (Part I) and 1615 (Part II), Don Quijote has provoked radically different interpretations. Taking as point of departure both the comic and the romantic interpretations, the course will explore the meaning of the Quijote across the centuries. Its aim will be to understand the Quijote both as an autonomous work of literature and as a highly creative response to the literary and cultural forces from which it was forged. In addition to the historical context and social conflicts in the Hapsburg monarchy, the course will focus on the literary history and the novel as a literary genre and a product of the Medieval "mixtification" which flourished in the Renaissance. Dist.: LIT; WCult: W. Professor Isabel Lozano.

In Fall 2022 - Spanish 70.02: One Hundred Years of Solitude.

Few literary works have ever fascinated readers all over the world the way One Hundred Years of Solitude has. Gabriel García Márquez's novel opens up a magical world where the boundaries that separate fantasy and reality, fairy tale and history seem to dissolve naturally. And yet, no fictional work has ever been more deeply grounded in the reality and history of a people. The book tells the incredible story of the Buendía family as it develops through the successive cycles of destruction and rebirth that shape history in the mythical world of Macondo. As the story unfolds it illuminates the wonders and terrors of the history of Latin American countries, the complexities and contradictions that have defined their peoples, and shaped their cultures. In this course we will read enjoy and analyze One Hundred Years of Solitude as well as a selection of García Márquez's short stories and journalistic works. The works will be discussed within the framework of major theoretical and historical issues and in constant dialogue with a variety of secondary sources. Dist.: LIT; WCult: NW. Professor: Beatriz Pastor.

SPAN 73: Special Topics in Hispanic Literary and Cultural Production

This course is offered periodically with varying content so that writers, genres, historical contexts, or theoretical approaches not otherwise provided in the curriculum may be studied. The course can be offered any term and its distinct content, theoretical, or methodological approach will depend on the area of specialization of the instructor. Spanish courses numbered 40 and above may be repeated for credit when offered as different topics. Prerequisite: SPAN 20.

In Spring 2022 - Spanish 73.04: Todo Borges.

Jorge Luis Borges is one of the most difficult and influential Latin American writers. His fascination with labyrinths, mirrors, time, infinity, blindness, and memory are legendary. We will spend the term reading as much as we can of Borges: his stories, detective fiction, poetry, correspondence, and speeches. We will also study his literary trajectory including his influences which stem from far and wide (Cervantes, Kafka, Poe, Chesterton, Schopenhauer), his "forgeries," his editorial work, literary criticism as well as reflections by his critics and the works of some of the writers whom he influenced. Students will be required to trace some of his legendary (real and imaginary) arcane sources. Borges critically and playfully embodies "world literature" while at the same time considering the role of Argentina and Argentine Literature within the complex network of transnational literature. Dist.: INT, LIT; WCult: NW. Professor Antonio Gómez.

In Summer 2022 - Spanish 73.11: Obscene Images. Intro. to Visual Studies in Latin America.

Violence, death, sex, disability, race, gender, poverty, and politics were regarded as unthinkable, intolerable, offensive, or simply obscene in different times and regions in Latin America. This course will provide a critical and theoretical approach to textual and visual representations from the 19th century to the present, which have generated controversy over their depiction of these cultural topics. Images of destruction, pictures of war, or paintings excluded by the mainstream culture will be used to familiarize the students with the production and consumption of visual and textual culture and the ethics of representation. The goal of the course is first, to introduce students to Visual Culture/Visual Studies in Latin America, second, to problematize the relation between representation and culture, and, finally, to evaluate the implication of these topics (sex, violence, race, gender, disability, etc…) in relation to power, knowledge, and ethics in Latin American culture. Dist.: ART; WCult.: NW. Professor Sebastián Díaz.

SPAN 75: Creative Writing in Spanish

This course offers a workshop in creative writing to be taught by prominent writers in residence in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese. It is designed for native speakers of Spanish, heritage speakers, and Spanish majors in their junior or senior years. Seminar-sized class meets twice or three times a week plus individual conferences when necessary. The class will consist of group workshops on student writing (fiction, poetry, and/or theater) and individual conferences with the instructor. Students will be admitted on a competitive basis and should submit a short writing sample of poetry, fiction, and/or a play to the Department's Administrator prior to obtaining permission to enroll. The limit for this class is 14. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

In Spring 2023 - Writing the Short Story.

By asking students to both read and write short stories in Spanish, this course explores how narrating can yield new forms of knowledge about the world around us. As we approach creative work as a way to begin understanding the experiences of others, we will observe a productive constraint: to never write about ourselves. Instead, students will construct characters and find voices through literature as well as through art, ethnography, current events, and even the campus and surrounding areas. Each week, careful analysis of texts by authors such as Silvina Ocampo, Valeria Luiselli, and Liliana Colanzi will highlight the reciprocity between reading and writing, while creative "labs" will cultivate story ideas. Practicing techniques such as listening and interviewing will help students generate material, and during in-class workshops they will receive feedback on drafts of their short stories. The course welcomes students with a range of writing skills, and no previous creative writing experience is required. Dist.: ART; W. Cult: NW. Professor Martina Broner.

Spanish 77: Text and Contexts. Topics in Writing

This course is designed to help students develop excellence in writing as they prepare for upper level literature and culture courses in Spanish. Topics will vary according to term and faculty as well as the "texts" studied in the course (literary, filmic, cultural, and visual). Given that thinking, reading, and writing are interdependent activities, Spanish 77 is designed to offer students an opportunity to study a topic of interest in Hispanic literature or culture while simultaneously emphasizing the advanced writing skills required of a research paper. Frequent exercises in writing and close textual study are basic to this course. Prerequisite: SPAN 20 or permission of instructor. (PDF).

In Spring 2022: Spanish 77.05: Advanced Writing with Frederico Garcia Lorca.

This is a writing course, so expressing your ideas and thoughts in coherent and well-thought-out papers and essays is as important as discussing the topic of Lorca's Theater. You will need to support your writing with evidence taken from the plays, the films, and the critical essays. You will be writing short and long responses and will make oral presentations. Peer review is an essential component of this course. 
 
The purpose of this course is to engage in meaningful conversations with Lorca's main topics in his theatrical plays. This is the first step to explore theatrical strategies and aesthetics techniques used by Lorca to convey meaning. We need to go beyond the simple description of a play's plot in order to to focus on what the texts are telling us about the author's literary universe and his contemporary society. We want to discover Lorca's mythical universe and his critical take on Spain's most traditional society. In this course, reading and expressing your ideas in writing are equality as important. Dist: LIT; WCult.: W. Professor Txetxu Aguado.

Spanish 80: Senior Seminar in Hispanic Studies

The capstone seminar in Hispanic Studies is designed to provide our majors with a small- group research and creative setting.  Students will be encouraged to explore a core problem that will guide their research and creative intervention throughout the term.  Conceived as a research laboratory, i.e., as a dynamic and experimental context, students will interactively develop a wide array of final projects.  Essay writing, visual arts explorations, performance pieces, photography, blogs, graphic novels, or short films are some examples of potential culminating projects.  The capstone seminar is open to senior majors and modified majors.

In Winter 2022 - Spanish 80.22: The Boom Novels of Spanish America.

This course examines Spanish America's explosive entrance onto the transnational literary scene in the 1960s during the Cold War. The novelists most typically associated with this "Boom" in Spanish American literature include Gabriel García Márquez, Julio Cortázar, Mario Vargas Llosa, Carlos Fuentes, and Alejo Carpentier. We will explore the political, economic, and aesthetic phenomena that produced the Boom. We will also study the effects of this Boom on both the development of the novel as a genre and on the global dissemination of the idea of Spanish America as a single cultural and ideological entity. Dist: LIT, WCult:NW. Professor Rebecca Biron.

In Spring 2022 - Spanish 80.23: Bullets and Letters: Basque Terrorism and the Arts.

This course will focus on Basque culture produced in response to ETA terrorism.  We will study the ideology that governs nationalist discourses, understand the relation between identity and violence, gender and power, and find in the arts (literature, film, painting, photography, and sculpture) a reason to make the humanities one of the legs upon which peace and reconciliation rest.  Documents include interviews and writings by former ETA militants and understanding the final dissolution of the organization in 2018.

Globalization has caused an important paradigmatic shift in how "small" cultures are studied and addressed.  Small in number but not in significance in current European discussions on democracy and terrorism, the Basque context is proof that the postnationalist turn that tends to govern how we think about ourselves in an ever more interconnected world actually clashes with how we experience our lives on the smaller scale of the everyday. The persistence of ETA terrorism (1959-2009), its death toll of nearly 1000 lives, and a very special turn to reconciliation and memory by many political and cultural actors makes this a timely course give how cultural productions and their textual strategies are contributing in new and exciting ways to processes geared towards peace and reconciliation. 

Special emphasis will be placed on the Nanclares de Oca Prison Project and its reconciliation process and interviews by former ETA militants and victims of terrorism.  Students will have the opportunity of meeting peace makers, the lead mediator, and possibly speak with victims of ETA violence firsthand at the "Unspeakable Truths" conference that will be held in Spring 2022. Dist: LIT; WCult:W. Professor Annabel Martín.

In Winter 2023 - Spanish 80: Capstone Pilot Course.

A capstone experience for seniors majoring in Hispanic Studies or Romance Studies. We will review major definitions of the field of study and consider debates about its disciplinary parameters. The primary goal of the course is to facilitate each student's completion of an original piece of scholarship that reflects their interest, skills, and unique contribution to the study of cultural discourse in the Spanish-speaking world. Professor Rebecca Biron.

In Spring 2023 - Spanish 80.25: Indignant Spain Today: Crisis and New Social Movements.

This course exams the notion of "crisis" as a creative paradigm for rethinking traditional experiences of the political, social, and cultural spheres in today's Spain.  The course will focus on the deep connections between democracy and alternative ways of thinking about the political participation of citizens confronting the dismantling of their social, family, and individual welfare by global and national neoliberalist economic and social policies.  Students will read from a wide array of texts (literature, cultural and political theory) and also watch documentaries and films on the idea of "crisis" as it is currently playing itself out in Spain's 15-m and Indignados movements. Works by: Mart'n Patino, Alvarez, Thorton, Grueso, Lacuesta, Arce among others. Dist: LIT; WCult: W. Professor Annabel Martín.

SPAN 83: Independent Study

A program of individual study directed by a member of the Spanish and Portuguese faculty. Spanish 83 will normally consist of a program of reading and research that is not covered in regularly scheduled course offerings. After consultation with the faculty advisor of the project, all Independent Study proposals must be submitted for approval to the Department. Only open to majors in Spanish or Romance Languages. Under normal circumstances, no student may receive credit for this course more than once. Students interested in pursuing and Independent Study must identify their topic and faculty advisor by the last week of the term prior to registering for Spanish 83. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

SPAN 90: Honors Course

Supervised independent research under the direction of a designated advisor. Honors majors will normally elect this course as the first in the required sequence (90 and 91) for completion of the Honors Program. SPAN 90 is intended to prepare the student for writing the Honors thesis, through readings in primary and secondary texts, theory and methodology. The course will include periodic written assignments and culminate in a final paper. Prerequisite: Admission to the Honors Program.

SPAN 91: Honors Seminar

A prearranged program of study and research during any term of the senior year, on a tutorial basis, with individual faculty members (normally the thesis advisor). A thesis and public presentation are the expected culmination of the course. Prerequisite: Prior admission to the Department's Honors Program; clear evidence of capability to perform honors level work, normally indicated by completion of SPAN 90 with a grade of B+ or higher.