All Courses in Spanish

Language and Culture

SPAN 1: Spanish I

Introduction to spoken and written Spanish. Intensive study of introductory grammar and vocabulary with a focus on culture. Oral class activities, readings and compositions. Weekly practice in the virtual language lab includes viewing TV series and films and weekly drill sessions. Never serves in partial satisfaction of the Distributive or World Culture Requirements.

Sample Syllabus

SPAN 2: Spanish II

Continuation of SPAN 1. Further intensive study of grammar and vocabulary with a focus on culture. Oral class activities, readings and compositions and continued practice in the virtual language laboratory. Weekly drill sessions. Never serves in partial satisfaction of the Distributive or World Culture Requirements. Open to first-year students by qualifying test and to others who have passed SPAN 1.

Sample Syllabus

SPAN 3: Spanish III

Continuation of SPAN 2. SPAN 3 provides additional, intensive study of grammar and vocabulary with a focus on literature and culture. Oral class activities, readings and compositions and continued practice in the virtual language laboratory. Weekly drill sessions. Completion of this course on campus or as part of the LSA constitutes fulfillment of the language requirement. Never serves in partial satisfaction of the Distributive or World Culture Requirements. Open to first-year students by qualifying test and to others who have passed SPAN 2.

Winter and Spring 2020 and 2021 - LSA Barcelona

Spring 2020 and 2021 - LSA Buenos Aires

Sample Syllabus

SPAN 5: (Language Study Abroad)

Taught in the context of the Language Study Abroad program, this course in Hispanic culture reinforces listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills in Spanish. The thematic focus is on local and regional art history, with special emphasis on the city as a dynamic form of cultural production through time. Attending to political, social, economic, and religious contexts, the course features brief presentations by local personnel as well as relevant field trips. Assignments include conversation, writing projects, oral presentations, and a final course examination. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Dartmouth Language Study Abroad Program. Dist: WCult: W (Spain), NW (Buenos Aires).

Winter and Spring 2020 and 2021 - LSA Barcelona

Spring 2020 and 2021 - LSA Buenos Aires

SPAN 6: (Language Study Abroad)

Taught in the context of the Language Study Abroad program, this introductory course in Hispanic literature strengthens listening, reading, speaking and writing skills in Spanish. The reading materials are selected to help students develop their analytical strategies as well as to expose them to relevant cultural issues and major figures of the region in which they are studying. Assigned work may include brief research papers, oral presentations, a mid-term exam and a final course examination. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Dartmouth Language Study Abroad Program. Dist: LIT; WCult: W (Spain), NW (Buenos Aires).

Winter and Spring 2020 and 2021 - LSA Barcelona

Spring 2020 and 2021 - LSA Buenos Aires

SPAN 7: First-Year Seminars in Spanish and Spanish-American Literature

The First-year Seminar Program serves four purposes. First, by means of a uniform writing requirement, the seminar stresses the importance of written expression in all disciplines. Second, it provides an attractive and exciting supplement to the usual introductory survey. Third, it guarantees each first-year student at least one small course. Fourth, the program engages each first-year student in the research process, offering an early experience of the scholarship that fuels Dartmouth's upper-level courses.

In Winter 2020 - Don Quixote and the Quixotic in Literature and Film.

Don Quixote regularly tops the lists of the greatest novels of all time.  In this course will examine Cervantes’ masterpiece and some of the ways it has influenced world literature and culture.  We will discuss themes related to the novel, including: what Don Quixote says about the dangers of reading (or watching films); the philosophical debate between realism and idealism; and the value of friendship and tolerance in times of crisis.  We will read selections of both Part I and Part II of Don Quixote and read critical works about it.  Films will include the musical Man of La Mancha as The Man Who Killed Don Quixote, the film completed by Terry Gilliam after a 20-year wait.  We will also study what remains of Shakespeare’s lost 1613 play based on Don Quixote. All readings and discussions will be in English. Professor Paul Carranza.

In Spring 2020 -

SPAN 9: Culture and Conversation: Advanced Spanish Language

This course serves as a bridge between SPAN 3 and SPAN 20. Through the intensive study of a variety of aural media (e.g., documentaries, TV and radio programs, films), grammar, vocabulary and speech acts as presented in the course packet, students will actively practice listening and speaking skills with the goal of reaching an Intermediate High Level (on the ACTFL scale). Additional written material may be added according to the professor’s particular interests. Prerequisite: SPAN 3; AP Lang 4 or AP Lit 4; local placement test 600+, or permission of the instructor. It serves as a prerequisite for SPAN 20.

Sample Syllabus

SPAN 15: LatinX Writing and Composition

This course draws on the strengths of Latinx Language Learners in order to enhance their skills in writing and composition. Using a variety of media and genres, students will explore the cultural experiences of US Latinx communities and the Spanish-speaking world. Students will write essays, narrative prose, and creative literary works that focus on structures related to languages and cultures in contact, as well as review grammar to expand their range from informal to academic communication. Students will also develop experiential learning projects throughout the term and participate in events around campus related to Spanish-speaking communities. This course can be used to fulfill the language requirement. It serves as pre-requisite for Spanish 20. May not be taken in conjunction with Spanish 9.

 

Advanced Language, Literature, and Cultural Studies

SPAN 20: Writing and Reading: A Critical and Cultural Approach

SPAN 20 is the first course of the Major/Minor, and serves as transition between the skills acquired through the Spanish language courses (Spanish LSA or equivalent preparation) and those needed for all upper-division courses (30 and above). Through the study of critical and theoretical vocabulary, and the reading of short stories, poems, films, theatrical plays and journalistic articles, students will acquire analytic tools to comprehend and analyze several types of texts. This course is also designed to familiarize students with different textual genres and a wide array of literary and interpretative key concepts. Prerequisite: Participation in one of the Spanish LSA programs; SPAN 9 or 15; exemption from SPAN 9 based on test scores (see Department web site); or permission of instructor. SPAN 20 may be taken in conjunction with 30-level survey courses. It serves as a prerequisite for all Spanish courses 40 and higher. Dist: LIT.

Summer 2019 and 2020 - LSA+ Santander, Spain

Fall 2019 and 2020 - LSA+ Cuzco, Peru

Sample Syllabus

SPAN 21: Traditional and Contemporary Andean Cosmogonies and Cultural Production: A Historical Approach (LSA+)

This course is designed to give students an understanding of the current intricacies of Peruvian Andean Cultures.  Peruvian society has undergone a series of historical transformations, complicated by the interface of Andean, Western, African and Amazonian traditions.  The running themes of the course will be interculturality, imposition of culture and cultural manipulations as they occur historically (conquest, mestizaje, racism, diglosia, globalization, etc.).  These themes will be addressed from a historical, anthropological, and sociological perspective.  The course program is coordinated with a variety of cultural visits and excursions that are an intrinsic part of its content. Dist: SOC WCult: NW.*

Fall 2019 and 2020 - LSA+ Cuzco

SPAN 22: Modern and Contemporary Spanish Artistic and Cultural Production (L.S.A.+)

This course will make students fluent in some of the main topics relevant to modern and contemporary Spanish cultural production, with a particular emphasis on Northern Spain.  The course will not count towards the major or minor. Dist: ART; WCult: W.

Summer 2019 and 2020 - LSA+ Santander

SPAN 23: Argentine Cultural Heritage (FSP)

This course deepens the student’s knowledge of the Argentine art and cultures through the study and discussion of the visual, architectural and plastic arts, as well as music and performance. The materials will expose the students to the main trends and topics of contemporary Argentine art, cultures and society. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program, Argentina. Dist: ART; WCult: NW.

Spring 2020 and 2021 - FSP Buenos Aires

SPAN 24: Spanish Cultural Heritage (FSP)

This course deepens the student’s knowledge of the Spanish art and cultures through the study and discussion of the visual, architectural and plastic arts, as well as music and performance. The materials will expose the students to the main trends and topics of contemporary Spanish art, cultures and society. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program, Spain. Dist: ART; WCult: W.

Fall 2019 and 2020 - FSP Madrid

SPAN 30: Introduction to Hispanic Studies I: Middle Ages to 17th Century

This course presents an overview of major literary trends and cultural productions from the Middle Ages to the 17th century in both their Spanish and Spanish American contexts. Students will read a representative selection of major literary works from that period, both Peninsular and Spanish-American, and discuss theoretical, aesthetic, and critical issues pertinent to the Renaissance, the Baroque, colonialism, syncretism, etc. Texts may also be cultural, visual, and/or filmic. Prerequisite: SPAN 20. Dist: LIT; WCult: W.

SPAN 31: Introduction to Hispanic Studies II: 18th and 19th Centuries

This course presents a chronological study of major trans-Atlantic literary trends and cultural productions, corresponding to the cultural and aesthetic movements of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Students will read a representative selection of major literary works, both Peninsular and Spanish-American, from that period and discuss theoretical, aesthetic, and critical issues pertinent to modernity, empire, enlightenment, nationalism, gender, democracy, etc. Texts may also be, cultural, visual, and/or filmic. Prerequisite: SPAN 20. Dist: LIT; WCult: W.

SPAN 32: Introduction to Hispanic Studies III: 20th - 21st Centuries

This course presents a chronological study of trans-Atlantic major literary trends and cultural productions, corresponding to the cultural and aesthetic movements from the 1880s to the present. Students will read a representative selection of major literary works from that period, both Peninsular and Spanish-American, and discuss theoretical, aesthetic, and critical issues pertinent to modernismo, the avant-garde, revolution, post-modernism, etc. Texts may also be cultural, visual, and/or filmic. Prerequisite: SPAN 20. Dist: LIT; WCult: W.

Summer 2019 and 2020 - LSA+ Santander

Fall 2019 and 2020 - LSA+ Cuzco

SPAN 33: Argentine Civilization: Society, Culture, and Politics in Argentina (FSP)

This course studies socio-political events in the Southern Cone that have shaped the contemporary configuration of society in Argentina. Emphasis will be placed on key political figures, social movements, oppositional tensions, dictatorship and democracy, and their articulation in the cultural field. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program. Dist: SOC; WCult: NW.

Spring 2020 and 2021 - FSP Buenos Aires

SPAN 34: Society, Culture and Politics in Spain (FSP)

This courses studies socio-political events in the Iberian Peninsula that have shaped the contemporary configuration of society in Spain. Emphasis will be placed on key political figures, social movements, oppositional tensions, dictatorship and democracy, and their articulation in the cultural field. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program, Spain. Dist: SOC; WCult: W.

Fall 2019 and 2020 - FSP Madrid

SPAN 35: Studies in Spanish-American Literature and Culture (FSP)

This course is designed to offer students an opportunity to study a topic of interest in Spanish American literature and culture through the reading of a wide variety of literary and cultural texts. Emphasis will be placed on Argentina and the Southern Cone. Topics may vary. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program, Argentina. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW.

Spring 2020 and 2021 - FSP Buenos Aires

SPAN 36: Studies in Modern and Contemporary Spanish Literature and Culture (FSP)

This course is designed to offer students an opportunity to study a topic of interest in the literature's and cultures of Spain through the reading of a wide variety of literary and cultural texts. Topics may vary. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program, Spain. Dist: LIT; WCult: W.

Fall 2019 and 2020 - FSP Madrid

SPAN 40: Hispanic Literature and Culture by Period

This course will focus on the study of the significant historical periods and cultural movements of the Hispanic world. It is organized according to chronological eras that are marked by distinct cultural and literary movements. Areas covered will be the Middle Ages, the culture of the Renaissance and the Baroque, the Colonial Period, Enlightenment and Modernity, Nineteenth-Century Romanticism and Realism, the Avant-Gardes, Post-modernism, and new developments in the contemporary period. One or more periods will be selected for study. Spanish courses numbered 40 and above may be repeated for credit when offered as different topics. Prerequisite: SPAN 20.

In Winter 2020- Spanish 40.10: Marginality and Novelistic Discourse in Early Modernity.

In this course we will explore the role of marginality in the configuration of the novelistic discourse in Early Modernity. Rather than assume that marginality implies social outcasts exclusively, we will work with a broader concept. Adventurers, religious minorities (such as witches, hermits, moriscos or renegades), rogues, or even children of wealthy families, drawn by the titillating charm of living dangerously, are the aesthetic substance of these novels. They articulate an aesthetic which embraces not only those characters that forge their identity in the fringes of society, but every day social types. Through the lens of marginality, and departing from some early examples, students will read and analyze a set of novels written in this period by canonical authors (Fernando de Rojas, Miguel de Cervantes, Lope de Vega, Francisco de Quevedo, María de Zayas, or Mateo Alemán) but also anonymous works such as La doncella Teodor or El abencerraje y la hermosa Jarifa. Dist: LIT; WCult: W. Professor Isabel Lozano.

In Spring 2021 - Spanish 40.07: Dark MIrror. The Spanish Detective Novel.

This course examines Spanish contemporary society through the distorted lens of one of the most popular literary genres: detective fiction or crime novel. Departing from some early examples, students will read and analyze several novels published during the period of Francoism (1939-1975) and the ensuing decades until present. Authors will include Francisco García Pavón, Manuel Vázquez Montalbán, Javier Marías, Antonio Muñoz Molina. Lorenzo Silva, Alicia Giménez Bartlett, and Dolores Redondo. Dist: LIT; WCult: W. Professor José del Pino.

In Spring 2021 - Spanish 40.11: Truth or Dare: Spanish American Testimonio and the Concept of Fake News.

This course examines the status of truth in moments of high-stakes political conflict. Current debates about fake news focus on social media and political polarization to make new arguments about the old concept of propaganda. Latin American testimonial narratives offer a rich history of the core issues in these debates.  We will examine written and filmic testimonios from Cuba, Chile, Guatemala, Argentina, Bolivia, Colombia, and Mexico, from the 1960s to the present day to explore the possibilities of truth-telling across opposed social groups. These texts typically (though not always) represent politically marginal perspectives or communities: indigenous groups, the poor, women, dissidents of various types. We will pay particular attention to the fusion of documentary narrative styles, more obviously fictional elements, and characteristics of autobiography. We will analyze the aesthetic, ethical, and political demands that the testimonio form makes on its readers/spectators. In addition to the testimonios themselves, we will read criticism of testimonio by anthropologists, sociologists, historians, and literary scholars to evaluate different disciplines’ approaches to reading testimonio. The course foregrounds the political implications of how truth is defined for each type of reading. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Professor Rebecca Biron.

Spanish 43: Hispanic Literature and Culture by Genre

A literary genre is defined as an established category of written work employing a set of recognizable common conventions, such as technique, style, structure or subject matter. This course will focus on the study of Hispanic literatures and cultures and is organized around one or more basic genres like poetry, drama, novel, and essay. Other articulating categories for the course may include epic poetry, tragic drama, short-fiction narrative, the picaresque novel, and the melodrama, among others. The course will provide students with the appropriate critical vocabulary to understand the specificity of the genre or sub-genre examined in this course. Prerequisite: SPAN 20.

In Summer 2019 - Spanish 43.06: Tango Argentino: Music, Dance, Poetry, Community

Since its birth the Argentine tango continues to be a complex art form with popular roots and international reach beyond the Southern Cone. The tango has stood the test of time as a form of popular culture that many consider a lifestyle, a religion, and a worldview. Since it is at once a type of music, a dance, a distinctive type of poetry and a community (social dance or milonga), the tango requires a variety of disciplines to interpret it. This course will provide students with tools to understand tango as music, poetry, dance, language (lunfardo), and melodrama, from the 19th century to its current state of political resistance and globalized commodification. The course will have an experiential component to allow space for listening to the music and learning basic tango salón footwork with invited guests. Dist: ART; WCult: NWProfessor Noelia Cirnigliaro

In Winter 2020 - Spanish 43.05: Drawn to Resist: The Latin American Comics

Cartoons and comics have played important roles in the political and social processes of Latin America for more than a century. This course is designed as a workshop, where students will approach the world of comics from a historical and practical point of view. It will cover the most significant periods of Latin American comics tradition. By the end of the class, students will be able to deploy a range of different methods for analyzing comics, including formal technique, genre, authorship, and intertextual analysis. The professor will also guide the students into a unique experience of personal exploration on how comics tell stories through words and images (no drawing skills are required). Works by Caloi, Fontanarrosa, Maitena, Montt, Oersterheld, Quino, Rius, etc. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Professor Ricardo Liniers Siri.

Spanish 45: Regional/National/Trans-Atlantic Approaches to Hispanic Studies

This course studies the complex intersections between literatures, languages, cultures and their national, regional, and trans-Atlantic contexts in Spain, Latin America, and the US.  In this course, literary and cultural expressions are studied in relation to place in a wide array of historical contexts.  Issues may include literature and colonialism, "indigenismo," the city/country dialectic, regional and national languages and cultural interdependence, the arts as buffers of political/nationalistic violence, national borders and cultural identity, and the formation of national literatures. Prerequisite: SPAN 20.

In Summer 2019- Spanish 45.01: Politics of Inequality, Economy, Social Struggle, and the 19th Century Latin American Novel.

This course explores the Latin-American nineteenth-century novelistic tradition through the scope of Marx’s definition of “Primitive Accumulation.” Starting from Latin America’s independence as a moment of foundational violence that reframes and crystalizes the inequality of social classes and races in the continent, we will explore the abuse and exploitation of slaves in Cuban mid-century society (Gertrudis Gómez de Avellaneda’s Sab -1841); the discrimination and mistreatment of indigenous communities justified by colonial traditions of servitude in Peru (Clorinda Matto de Turner’s Aves sin Nido -1889); and the anti-European immigrant movements in Argentina at the end of the century (Eugenio Cambaceres’ En la Sangre -1887). Theoretical framework by: Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels, José Carlos Mariátegui, John Lynch, György Lukács, Eric Hobsbawm, and David Harvey. Dist: Lit; WCult NW. Professor Sebastían Díaz. 

Spanish 50: Gender and Sexuality in Hispanic Studies

This course will explore how the study of gender and sexuality is integral to understanding the complexities of Hispanic societies and cultures. In addition to analyzing literary texts and cultural and artistic productions, students will also examine theoretical and critical approaches to the study of gender and sexuality. Topics may include feminist movements, the construction and performance of gender, the theories as they relate to Hispanic embodiments and representations in literature and culture. Prerequisites: SPAN 20.

In Spring 2020- Spanish 50.01: Of Machos and Malinches: Gender and Sexual Identities in Latin/o American Literature and Culture.

This course examines how gender and sexuality align with or contest local discourses on Latin/o American cultural autochthony and national identity and explores gender and sexuality in the context of global culture and transnationalism. We will also analyze how gender and sexual identities are articulated in language, performance, and visual and aural media.  Along with primary literary texts, film, art, and music, students will engage with scholarly texts that contextualize the historical, cultural, and linguistic traditions from which gender and sexual identities emerge, as well as those critical and theoretical interventions that deconstruct essentialist notions of the body and scrutinize the political implications of oppositional discourses on gender and sexuality. Dist: CI; LIT. Professor Israel Reyes. 

In Spring 2020-Spanish 50.04: Let's Not Talk About It. Eroticism in Modern Spain.

Erotic literature in Spain has often been dismissed as inferior, offensive and taboo. However, many of these materials circulated clandestinely and found their way to underground publications. By exploring literary works, engravings, photographs, and films, this course intends to concentrate on the erotic nature of a number of Spanish cultural works starting from the 18th to the mid-20th century in which the obscene, the pornographic and the erotic serve as platform to discuss other issues such as gender politics, gendered relations, Iberian humor, social marginalization, race, identity, and the concept of Spanishness. Dist: LIT; WCult W. Professor Sara Muñoz.

In Winter 2021 -Spanish 50.02: Sexual and Social Identity in Film and Literature in Post-Franco Spain.

This course addresses changes in Spanish society since the end of the dictatorship.  These include the relativization of family, love, drugs, sexuality, life, death, and democracy; and the devaluation of morals, history, and culture.  Authors include Vázquez Montalbán, Marías, Loriga, Montero, Riera, Almodóvar, de la Iglesia, Amenábar, and Balagueró. Dist: LIT; WCult W. Professor Joseph Aguado.

SPAN 53: Topics in Spanish Linguistics, Rhetoric, and Poetics

The focus of study for this course will be the evolution of the Spanish language from its old and early modern manifestations to contemporary uses. Specific geographical contexts will be given special attention. Topics may include the constitution of Castilian as a national language and its relation to other peninsular languages; the history of linguistic change on all levels (phonetic/phonological, morphological, syntactic, and semantic); the influence of Arabic, indigenous languages of the Americas, English, and dialectal variants. Fundamental notions of rhetoric and poetics will be central to this course as well. Spanish courses numbered 40 and above may be repeated for credit when offered as different topics. Prerequisite: SPAN 20.

In Spring 2021 -Spanish 53.03: Bilingualism. Cognitive and Sociolinguistic Approaches to Bilingualism in the Spanish-Speaking World.

This course examines bilingualism both as a linguistic and a social phenomenon, with special attention to Spanish speaking communities. After taking this course, students will (a) gain a basic understanding of the relationship between cognitive development and language acquisition in bilingual speakers; (b) be able to identify and analyze linguistic patterns of language change and interaction in bilingual speech communities in Latin America, Spain, and the United States; (c) reflect critically on issues related to language policy and bilingualism in education; and (d) examine representations of bilingualism in culture. Dist: INT; WCult: W. Professor Roberto Rey Agudo.

Spanish 55: Hispanic Literature, Culture, and Politics

This is an interdisciplinary course that studies through diverse representations in literature and the arts major sociopolitical realities that have shaken and transformed the Hispanic world such as the Conquest, colonialism, the rise of the modern nation states, the Mexican and Cuban revolutions, the Spanish Civil War, Latin America's "dirty" wars, etc.  The course will explore the interconnection between culture and politics allowing the student to read culture as a political text and political events as texts. Prerequisites: SPAN 20.

In Winter 2020- Spanish 55.10: Mexican Utopias: 19th and 20th Century Socialist Literature and Thought. 

This course explores the images of otherworldly places, perfect communities and future societies in Mexican culture. We will focus on how the utopian imagination entered into relation with science and socialism throughout the 19th and early 20th centuries. Through the reading of early science fiction works and socialist utopias by Mexican artists, we will discuss the impact of "utopian" thinkers (Saint Simon, Fourier, Owen) and scientific discourses (astronomy, medicine, hypnotism) on Mexican literature. Dist: LIT; WCult NW. Professor Jorge Quintana- Navarrete.

In Spring 2020- Spanish 55.11: Bullets and Letters: Basque Terrorism and the Arts.

This course will focus on Basque culture produced in response to ETA terrorism.  We will study the ideology that governs nationalist discourses, understand the relation between identity and violence, gender and power, and find in the arts (literature, film, painting, photography, and sculpture) a reason to make the humanities one of the legs upon which peace and reconciliation rest.  Documents include interviews and writings by former ETA militants and understanding the final dissolution of the organization in 2018. Dist: LIT; WCult: W. Professor Annabel Martín.

In Spring 2020- Spanish 55.05: Indignant Spain: Crisis and New Social Movements Today.

This course exams the notion of "crisis" as a creative paradigm for rethinking traditional experiences of the political, social, and cultural spheres in today's Spain.  The course will focus on the deep connections between democracy and alternative ways of thinking about the political participation of citizens confronting the dismantling of their social, family, and individual welfare by global and national neoliberalist economic and social policies.  Students will read from a wide array of texts (literature, cultural and political theory) and also watch documentaries and films on the idea of "crisis" as it is currently playing itself out in Spain's 15-m and Indignados movements.  Works by: Mart’n Patino, Alvarez, Thorton, Grueso, Lacuesta, Arce among others. Dist: LIT; WCult: W. Professor Annabel Martín.

SPAN 60: Race and Ethnicity in Hispanic Studies

A common misperception about race and ethnicity is that they are uniformly defined and that one region’s understanding of these terms is identical to any other. How are race and ethnicity conceptualized and represented in Spain, Latin America, and U.S. Latino communities? This course will examine the particular historical, regional, and cultural factors that give rise to different notions of race and ethnicity in the Hispanic world. Individual offerings of this course may focus on one or more of the following: Moorish Spain and the Reconquista; the Jewish Diaspora in Spain and Latin America; indigenous societies in Latin America; racial and cultural “mestizaje”; whiteness, racial purity, and “blanqueamiento”; slavery, the African Diaspora, and “afro-latinidades.” Spanish courses numbered 40 and above may be repeated for credit when offered as different topics. Prerequisite: SPAN 20.

In Fall 2019 - Spanish 60.03: Racism at Work Then and Now. 

This course will discuss the aesthetic projects and the ideological suggestions stemming from a long history of representations of race, ethnicity, and culture in Spanish American literature. A focus will be on those fueling the constitution of colonial and neo-colonial projects, and those reshaping decolonization and national identities. Particular attention will be given to bigoted images upon the “subaltern” other, from notions of a lesser humanity and condescendence to thoughts for marginalization, oppression and open racism. Cases of genuine understanding and integration of the other will be scrutinized as well. Materials for this class include selections from Columbus, Cortés, Guamán Poma, Las Casas, Garcilaso, Lunarejo, Avellaneda, Villaverde, Mansilla, Albújar, Matto, Sarmiento, Vasconcelos, Guillén, J.M. Arguedas, Menchú, Cornejo Polar and Fernández Retamar. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Professor Raúl Bueno.

SPAN 63: Hispanic Film Studies

Film and the visual arts in Spain, Latin America, and/or the US will be studied under different approaches in order to: understand the historical evolution of film making within these contexts; examine the different film genres (surrealism, neorealism, melodrama, film noir, Hollywood realism, animation, documentary, etc.) in their Hispanic contexts; study the body of work of renowned Latino, Spanish, and Latin American filmmakers and visual artists; analyze important cultural or historical events through their visual representations (the Mexican Revolution, the Spanish Civil War, the Cuban Revolution, end of Francoism, etc.); etc. Students will become familiar with relevant concepts in film analysis, film theory, and cultural studies and learn how issues of representation in the visual arts are linked to their literary counterparts. Spanish courses numbered 40 and above may be repeated for credit when offered as different topics. Prerequisite: SPAN 20.

In Fall 2019 - Spanish 63.08: The Many Faces of Brazilian Cinema.

This course, directed to Spanish language students, aims to give a comprehensive vision of the richness and diversity of Brazil by introducing its culture and society through the study of Brazilian contemporary cinematic productions.  Topics include: The Other’s gaze in Brazil, redefinition of national identity and history, reassessment of African and indigenous roots, concepts of good and evil, rural and urban violence, popular culture, and representations of race and gender. Class discussion also focuses on documentaries, reviews, and critical articles. The course is conducted in Spanish. All movies are shown in Portuguese with Spanish or English subtitles. Dist: ART; WCult: NW. Professor: Rodolfo Franconi.

In Winter 2020 - Spanish 63.07: Radical Women of Latin American Cinema.

This course proposes to revise Latin American film historiography by foregrounding contributions by women filmmakers that challenge their audiences to radically rethink categories of politics, gender, race, body, sexuality, aesthetics, and spectatorship. In dialogue with narrative and documentary films, readings will question established definitions of feminist film theory by including a majority of voices from Latin American and Chicana, as well as third- and fourth-wave feminisms. Course to be conducted entirely in English. Dist: ART; WCult: NW. Professor: Thomas Matusiak.

In Winter 2021 - Spanish 63.09: Spanish History on the Screen.

In Spring 2021 - Spanish 63.01: Latin American Film.

In this survey of Latin American film we will study the Mexican Golden Age of film (1936-1969), Cuba’s revolutionary film (Lucia) as well as other radical films of the 60s (Sangre del condor), and women’s films. We will end looking at the most important production coming out of Latin America today such as the films of Francisco Lombardi, Claudia Llosa, Lucrecia Martel and others. We will also study important film manifestos. Dist: ART; WCult: NW. Professor: Silvia Spitta.

SPAN 65: Hispanic Performance, Media, and the Arts

In our increasingly globalized society, what impact have transnationalism and new technologies had on the formation and articulation of local cultures in the Hispanic world? How do subjects remember and represent themselves as embodied actors in the spaces where conflicting and contestatory identities meet? How have television, the visual and graphic arts, and music redefined national space and identity in Spanish, Latin American, and U.S. Latino communities? Individual offerings of this course may focus on one or more of the following: theater, performance, and performativity; comics and the graphic arts; literature and the marketplace; the politics of mass media; sports and national identity; and popular culture’s strategies of resistance. Spanish courses numbered 40 and above may be repeated for credit when offered as different topics. Prerequisite: SPAN 20.

In Fall 2019 - Spanish 65.10: The Politics of Latin American Identities.

What meanings are produced when we invite others to look at our bodies? How do these meanings change when our bodies are live, on stage, as opposed to on film or in printed literature? How do we change when we look at others' live bodies? To begin to answer these questions, we will examine the ways in which identities and power are (re)presented through live, deliberate performance as well as the multiple ways in which “performative texts” can be found. This course focuses on cultural production in relation to contemporary sites of identity politics, and as such we will analyze theoretical texts (such as Richard Schechner, Diana Taylor, and Josefina Alcazar), theatrical works (Yuyachkani, Jesusa Rodríguez, Teatro de los Andes, etc.), watch videos of live performances (from the folkloric, to the political, to the artistic), as well as read more traditional texts (novel, short-story, news, etc.). This course engages cultural theory, visual art, film, performance, literature, and activist interventions that illuminate the human impact and costs that characterize contemporary identity politics. This will lead us to formulate questions that invite us to think about gender, race, and the construction of Latin American identities in contemporary times. Dist: ART; WCult NW. Professor Analola Santana.

In Summer 2020 - Spanish 65.07: Staged Rebellions.

In this class, we will be studying plays from Spanish-speaking Latin America. To give coherence to this broad field, the readings will focus on plays that have rebellion and the rebel as their central theme. Our goal is to see how these themes are developed dramatically and theatrically, as well as within the historical and national context of each play-text and performance. An important part of our discussions and performance analyses will involve the nature of rebellion, its manifestations, and consequences. Dist: ART; WCult NW. Professor Analola Santana.

In Fall 2020 - Spanish 65.12: Reading Spain with Goya.

Francisco de Goya (1746-1828) lived in a period of intense political upheaval, civil wars and social turmoil. His early work showed the influence of the Enlightenment and had a critical point of view that aimed to not only please but also educate his viewers. As time went by, the ravages of illness, war, and political repression showed in his paintings through impactful and enigmatic imagery that upended the traditional role of an artist and that has earned him a relevant place in contemporary Spanish culture, as shown in his numerous films that bring him alive. Although he became a court painter and was well connected to the monarchy, a closer look to his paintings reveals a critical stance that urges his viewers to reflect on the lack of meaning in modern society. From the royal tapestries and portraits, to the incisive Caprichos, the impactful Disasters of the War and the desperate Black Paintings, we will examine the history of Spain through Goya's major works, not only as subject but also as object of representation in literature and in films. Dist: LIT; WCult: W. Professor Sara Muñoz.

In Fall 2020 - Spanish 65.13: The World of Frieda Kahlo.

This course focuses on the life and art of Mexican artist Frida Kahlo, one of the most iconic figures in art history. Kahlo has been praised and revered by art experts and casual observers alike and in the past decades the commercial use of her image has grown exponentially. The course will delve into the political and artistic influences that shaped her artwork, from the political effervescence of the Mexican Revolution, to her interest in folk and indigenous culture, to her involvement with feminist, surrealist and Marxist ideas. We will also analyze how her life and art became a global phenomenon in pop culture known as “Fridamania”. Dist: ART; WCult: NW. Professor Jorge Quintana-Navarrete.

SPAN 70: Great Works of Hispanic Literature: Don Quixote and One Hundred Years of Solitude

Few novels of the Hispanic world have had greater resonance than Cervantes’ Don Quijote (published between 1605 and 1615) and Gabriel García Márquez’ Cien años de soledad (1969). Both have continually fascinated their readers and provoked myriad interpretations and reinterpretations. This course seeks to understand each text as an autonomous work of literature and as a highly creative response to the literary and cultural forces in which it was forged. Individual offerings of this course will focus on one of these literary masterpieces. Spanish courses numbered 40 and above may be repeated for credit when offered as different topics. Prerequisite: SPAN 20.

In Winter 2021 - Spanish 70.02: One Hundred Years of Solitude.

Few literary works have ever fascinated readers all over the world the way One Hundred Years of Solitude has. Gabriel García Márquez’s novel opens up a magical world where the boundaries that separate fantasy and reality, fairy tale and history seem to dissolve naturally. And yet, no fictional work has ever been more deeply grounded in the reality and history of a people. The book tells the incredible story of the Buendía family as it develops through the successive cycles of destruction and rebirth that shape history in the mythical world of Macondo. As the story unfolds it illuminates the wonders and terrors of the history of Latin American countries, the complexities and contradictions that have defined their peoples, and shaped their cultures. In this course we will read enjoy and analyze One Hundred Years of Solitude as well as a selection of García Márquez’s short stories and journalistic works. The works will be discussed within the framework of major theoretical and historical issues and in constant dialogue with a variety of secondary sources. Dist.: LIT; WCult: NW. Professor Beatriz Pastor.

SPAN 73: Special Topics in Hispanic Literary and Cultural Production

This course is offered periodically with varying content so that writers, genres, historical contexts, or theoretical approaches not otherwise provided in the curriculum may be studied. The course can be offered any term and its distinct content, theoretical, or methodological approach will depend on the area of specialization of the instructor. Spanish courses numbered 40 and above may be repeated for credit when offered as different topics. Prerequisite: SPAN 20.

In Fall 2019 - Spanish 73.09: George Ticknor '1807: The Legacy of a Dartmouth Hispanist'.

Two hundred years ago, George Ticknor returned to Boston after a life-changing four-year period of study (Germany) and travel (Spain, Portugal, France) in Europe. He accepted a position at Harvard University as the first professor of Romance Languages, a position that allowed him to integrate the study of Spanish, Portuguese and French into the core curriculum. In 1849, he published his influential History of Spanish Literature, a work that set the foundation for the modern study of the literature and culture of Spain. This course will explore the life and writings of this outstanding Dartmouth alumnus, as well as its legacy in the 21st Century. Dist: LIT; WCult W. Professor José del Pino.

In Spring 2020 - Spanish 73.04: Todo Borges.

Jorge Luis Borges is one of the most difficult and influential Latin American writers. His fascination with labyrinths, mirrors, time, infinity, blindness, and memory are legendary. We will spend the term reading as much as we can of Borges: his stories, detective fiction, poetry, correspondence, and speeches. We will also study his literary trajectory including his influences which stem from far and wide (Cervantes, Kafka, Poe, Chesterton, Schopenhauer), his “forgeries,” his editorial work, literary criticism as well as reflections by his critics and the works of some of the writers whom he influenced. Students will be required to trace some of his legendary (real and imaginary) arcane sources. Borges critically and playfully embodies "world literature" while at the same time considering the role of Argentina and Argentine Literature within the complex network of transnational literature. Dist.: INT, LIT; WCult: NW. Professor Silvia Spitta.

SPAN 75: Creative Writing in Spanish

This course offers a workshop in creative writing to be taught by prominent writers in residence in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese. It is designed for native speakers of Spanish, heritage speakers, and Spanish majors in their junior or senior years. Seminar-sized class meets twice or three times a week plus individual conferences when necessary. The class will consist of group workshops on student writing (fiction, poetry, and/or theater) and individual conferences with the instructor. Students will be admitted on a competitive basis and should submit a short writing sample of poetry, fiction, and/or a play to the Department’s Administrator prior to obtaining permission to enroll. The limit for this class is 14. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

Spanish 77: Text and Contexts. Topics in Writing

This course is designed to help students develop excellence in writing as they prepare for upper level literature and culture courses in Spanish. Topics will vary according to term and faculty as well as the "texts" studied in the course (literary, filmic, cultural, and visual). Given that thinking, reading, and writing are interdependent activities, Spanish 77 is designed to offer students an opportunity to study a topic of interest in Hispanic literature or culture while simultaneously emphasizing the advanced writing skills required of a research paper. Frequent exercises in writing and close textual study are basic to this course. Prerequisite: SPAN 20 or permission of instructor. (PDF).

Spanish 80: Senior Seminar in Hispanic Studies

The capstone seminar in Hispanic Studies is designed to provide our majors with a small- group research and creative setting.  Students will be encouraged to explore a core problem that will guide their research and creative intervention throughout the term.  Conceived as a research laboratory, i.e., as a dynamic and experimental context, students will interactively develop a wide array of final projects.  Essay writing, visual arts explorations, performance pieces, photography, blogs, graphic novels, or short films are some examples of potential culminating projects.  The capstone seminar is open to senior majors, senior minors and modified majors.

In Winter 2020- Spanish 80: Senior Seminar.

The capstone seminar in Hispanic Studies is designed to provide our majors with a small- group research and creative setting.  Students will be encouraged to explore a core problem that will guide their research and creative intervention throughout the term.  Conceived as a research laboratory, i.e., as a dynamic and experimental context, students will interactively develop a wide array of final projects.  Essay writing, visual arts explorations, performance pieces, photography, blogs, graphic novels, or short films are some examples of potential culminating projects.  The capstone seminar is open to senior majors, senior minors and modified majors. Professor Jorge Quintana-Navarrete.

In Spring 2020 - Spanish 80.19: Archive Fever: Cultures and Knowledge in an Unequal World.

To achieve an advanced and nuanced understanding of the role of archives for cultural diversity and knowledge circulation, paying specific attention to digital transformation in contexts of knowledge asymmetries. (1) Understand patterns and developments of the geopolitics of knowledge from the perspective of Latin America and the Caribbean; (2) Get to know processes  and practices  of  “archives” (libraries, museums, archives in the stricter sense);(3) Discuss the outcomes  and the implications of digital transformation; (4) Bridge theory and practice via concrete archival experiences. Professors Silvia Spitta and Barbara Göbel.

In Winter 2021- Spanish 80: Senior Seminar.

The capstone seminar in Hispanic Studies is designed to provide our majors with a small- group research and creative setting.  Students will be encouraged to explore a core problem that will guide their research and creative intervention throughout the term.  Conceived as a research laboratory, i.e., as a dynamic and experimental context, students will interactively develop a wide array of final projects.  Essay writing, visual arts explorations, performance pieces, photography, blogs, graphic novels, or short films are some examples of potential culminating projects.  The capstone seminar is open to senior majors, senior minors and modified majors. Professor Israel Reyes.

In Spring 2021 - Spanish 80.18: Luis Buñuel: Cinema of Desire.

Few filmmakers can claim to have produced a rich filmography in different countries spanning five decades. Luis Buñuel (1900-1983) born in the Spanish region of Aragón became during his youth a most successful director in France with his surrealist transgressive films Un chien andalou (1928) and L’age d’or (1929), made in collaboration with Salvador Dalí. After the Spanish Civil War, and as an exile in México, Buñuel directed some of the most influential films of Mexican cinema. Later on, he worked again in France and Spain where he directed much admired films like Viridiana (1961) and Belle de Jour (1967): he also made films for the English-speaking audience. In spite of its diversity, the spectator can always find the buñuelian trademark in all of them: an anti-establishment ideological stance combined with a most compassionate gaze on the human condition. This course will present an in-depth vision of Buñuel’s filmography within the aesthetic and political context of his time. Dist.: ART; WCult.: W. Professor José del Pino.

SPAN 83: Independent Study

A program of individual study directed by a member of the Spanish and Portuguese faculty. Spanish 83 will normally consist of a program of reading and research that is not covered in regularly scheduled course offerings. After consultation with the faculty advisor of the project, all Independent Study proposals must be submitted for approval to the Department. Only open to majors in Spanish or Romance Languages. Under normal circumstances, no student may receive credit for this course more than once. Students interested in pursuing and Independent Study must identify their topic and faculty advisor by the last week of the term prior to registering for Spanish 83. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

SPAN 90: Honors Course

Supervised independent research under the direction of a designated advisor. Honors majors will normally elect this course as the first in the required sequence (90 and 91) for completion of the Honors Program. SPAN 90 is intended to prepare the student for writing the Honors thesis, through readings in primary and secondary texts, theory and methodology. The course will include periodic written assignments and culminate in a final paper. Prerequisite: Admission to the Honors Program.

SPAN 91: Honors Seminar

A prearranged program of study and research during any term of the senior year, on a tutorial basis, with individual faculty members (normally the thesis advisor). A thesis and public presentation are the expected culmination of the course. Prerequisite: Prior admission to the Department's Honors Program; clear evidence of capability to perform honors level work, normally indicated by completion of SPAN 90 with a grade of B+ or higher.