Department Chair and Professor trip to Cuba

"During spring break, about a year after President Obama’s executive order re-opening cultural and commercial pathways to Cuba, a group of Dartmouth faculty and staff went to Havana to celebrate the opening of the Galería Haydee Santamaría, an elegantly renovated art gallery that will serve as a classroom building for exchange students. The travelers met with Cuban scholars and officials as well as faculty and staff from the Consortium for Advanced Studies Abroad (CASA), which includes Dartmouth and eight other U.S. colleges and universities.

Lecturer and writer Kianny N. Antigua latest publication

Synopsis: “Tiana believes that her world is twisted: her Mom spends little time with her and usually leaves her with her grandma. Tiana then imagines how it would all be if the world were upside down: if kids went out and work and their parents stayed home playing.”

Out of the Archive: Photography, Patrimony, and Performance in Latin America

Thursday April 14th

Location: Haldeman 246

2:00 Welcoming remarks by Director of The Leslie Center for the Humanities, Graziella Parati

2:15-4:15 Out of the Archives: El Cusco de Martin Chambi

  • Silvia Spitta (Dartmouth College) “Intervening in the Archive”
  • Jill Baron (Dartmouth College) “In the Chambi Archive”
  • Julio Pantoja (Universidad Nacional de Tucumán) “El ojo rasgado”

4:30-6:30 Andean Archives and Glass Plate Photography

Chair Raul Bueno (Dartmouth College)

Another Award for Our Department!

Kianny N. Antigua, Spanish Lecturer, was just awarded the XI Premio Letras de Ultramar (in Children's Literature), for her book Elementos. This literary prize is the highest award given to Dominican writers living abroad, and it is sponsored by the Dominican Republic's Ministry of Culture via the Office of the Dominican Commissioner of Culture in the US.

Full story in Spanish

Celebrating the New Wave of Ibero-American Cinema

Starting January 13, 2016, Dartmouth will host an Ibero-American film festival on six consecutive Wednesday nights.  Thanks to the generosity of the Spanish & Portuguese, Film and Media Studies and Environmental Studies departments, the festival will bring new Spanish and Portuguese-language feature films and documentaries to campus, complementing a diversity of curricular activities.  Documentaries about the Amazon, the US/Mexico border, and the ETA conflict in Spain, in addition to feature films from Argentina, Puerto Rico, and Venezuela, will draw students from Spanish & Portuguese, Film & Media Studies, Latin American, Latino/a & Caribbean Studies, Women's & Gender Studies, Environmental Studies, and Earth Sciences.  The festival will also be widely advertised in order to attract attendees from outside of the Dartmouth community.  This festival was also made possible with the support of Pragda, SPAIN arts & culture and the Secretary of State for Culture of Spain.

January 13th 7PM- Bad Hair (Pelo Malo)

Nicaragua trip with Dartmouth Students

A group of 19 Dartmouth undergraduate students, three medical professionals, and two Geisel medical students recently traveled to the northern Atlantic autonomous region (RAAN) of Nicaragua and spent two weeks on a experiential learning international service trip working as volunteers in a medical clinic and on a construction team. Participants in the program engaged in thoughtful reflection, learned many aspects about Nicaraguan culture and history from the communities in Nicaragua, and experienced deep personal growth, as well as practiced their Spanish with their Nicaraguan hosts and the patients, who came to the medical clinic. For more information about the Nicaragua trip, please contact the Dartmouth Center for Service or Prof. Douglas Moody.

Dartmouth College Nicaragua Programs

First LSA+ in Cusco, Peru featured in the Dartmouth Now

A Language Study Abroad Plus Program in Cusco, Peru started this fall 2015. A group of students from the Spanish and Portuguese department spent three month in South America, and here is how they celebrated Thanksgiving!

Read the full article featured in the Dartmouth Now, using this LINK

 

 

 

 

 

 

"Jauja" Movie Screening Jan 15th

FRIDAY JANUARY 15, 7PM

LOEW AUDITORIUM, BLACK FAMILY VISUAL ARTS CENTER

Followed by an in-depth Q&A post screening with Director Lisandro Alonso

Lisandro Alonso is a key figure of the New Argentine Cinema, a loosely connected new generation of filmmakers that has emerged since the late 1990s. The most radical, controversial, and arguably original representative of this new wave, Alonso is the director of La libertad/Freedom (2001), Los muertos/The Dead (2004), Fantasma (2006), Liverpool (2008) and, most recently, Jauja (2014).

With Jauja, the film we plan to screen at Dartmouth, Alonso has turned towards a somewhat traditional narrative cinema. Co-written with the poet Fabían Casas, photographed by Finnish cinematographer Timo Salminen, and starring Viggo Mortensen, the film is a colonial adventure that focuses on the period of the "conquest of the desert" during the late 1870s. A quasi-Western, it has been compared John Ford's The Searchers but also Joseph Conrad's novel Heart of Darkness. Alonso's film has garnered wide-spread acclaim at international film festivals, particularly Cannes, where most of his films were premiered.

Lecture by Luis Castellvi on El rapto de San Ignacio- Jan 19th

“This paper will address the epic poem San Ignacio (Madrid, 1666) by the Jesuit Hernando Domínguez Camargo (Viceroyalty of Peru, 1606-1659), paying particular attention to the depiction of the saint’s rapture at Manresa (book II, canto V). This passage shows how the poetic description of an ecstatic vision is a subgenre of ekphrasis, based on the assumption that the imagination of the poet may go beyond the testimony of the mystic. The paper will look at how Camargo reads and responds to his two main models – religious epics (Belmonte Bermúdez, Escobar y Mendoza, Oña) and Góngora – blending them into something new. I will focus on ekphrasis in order to argue that we should complement this reading/re-writing process with seeing/looking at visual art portraying religious ecstasy. A final reflection will be devoted to how readers might respond to Camargo’s mixture of orthodox doctrinal content and an aestheticized sense of the world.”

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